Ringette players in Manitoba fear their sport is dying | CBC Kids News

Ringette players in Manitoba fear their sport is dying | CBC Kids News


Callie: The sport of
ringette has been around for 55 years, but has the
sport reached its peak? With ice hockey becoming
more and more popular to female players,
can ringette survive? I’m Callie Lane and today
we’re going to be talking to some coaches, players,
and experts about how the sport is
dealing with change. [music] Ringette was invented
in 1963 by Sam Jacks, a park and recreation
director in North Bay, Ontario. His three sons
all played hockey, but believed that females
should have the same opportunities to
play an on-ice game. [soft music] Ringette has faced
some fierce competition from hockey over
the last 20+ years, due to the success of the
Women’s National Hockey Team. The national team
has won several world championships and
four Olympic gold medals. Even though ringette is
not an Olympic sport, some players and coaches
would like to see the sport expand and
provide more opportunities for young players. Ringette isn’t in the
Olympics currently, but there should be
opportunities for it to be in the Olympics
because it’s played in multiple countries. I feel like ringette isn’t
as popular as hockey, and is kind of dying. I think that ringette
isn’t very popular, but like…hockey
is more popular, but I like to stay
in this sport because I know it better. [soft music] I think exposure and
getting the word out there. I think there’s still a
lot of people that have no idea what the game
of ringette is about and how awesome it is. Once parents are
exposed to the game, they actually see what
it’s like and realize that it’s an amazing game
that they want their daughters to be a part of. A lot of older ringette
girls are trying to give back to the sport,
and inspire younger girls to keep playing, but I feel
like people are making the switch just because
ringette’s not in the Olympics and there’s
nothing to go towards that will pay out in the end. [soft music] Callie: A lot of ringette
players today find themselves playing
the sport for the friendships and because playing
ringette runs deep in their family history. I play ringette because
it’s a sport where I can meet a bunch of girls from
a different area, and I was drawn to it
when my dad put me on skates when I was about
three years old and put me in the sport. My mom really liked
playing ringette before, so we saw a “come
try ringette” thing, and I was like, a really
little kid back then. I was like,
“Ooh, what’s this?!” and she’s like, “Oh! I used to play that,
we should come try it.” And I was like, “OK.” Callie: And it’s not just
the players who love the sport of ringette –
the coaches are just as passionate about the
game; good competition, team bonding,
and friendships are what keep them
in the game. The biggest thing I
love about the sport is the competitiveness and
the speed and of course, I’ve played with a bunch
of girls that I’ve played with for 10 years now,
so the friendships make or break the sport. I believe it’s a
true team sport. Callie: Todd Buchanon with
Ringette Manitoba says that playing ringette has
advantages over playing hockey, especially when it comes
to skating and teamwork. And I think from a skill
development perspective, it allows you to develop
your skating skills quicker and in a more fluid way
than perhaps hockey. Callie: Buchanon says
that while ringette leagues continue to
change in size, the leagues are
becoming more competitive at the amateur level
and the national level. For CBC Kids News,
I’m Callie Lane. [music]

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