Redevelopment Authority 7-9-19

Redevelopment Authority 7-9-19


– All right, I’m gonna press record. – We haven’t got a quorum yet, have we? No, no, is Kathy coming? You’re in charge of Kathy. – [Woman] I’m in charge
of Kathy. And I did not. I was at a meeting. – Record. It was recording for a while. Okay, now. – All right, ready to open a meeting? – Yes. – City of Green Bay
Redevelopment Authority. Roll call, please. – [Clerk] All right, Chair Gary Delveaux. – Here. – [Clerk] Vice Chair Matt Schueller. – [Matt] Here. – [Clerk] Alderperson Barbara Dorff. – Here. – [Clerk] Jim Hubrick has to be excused. Deby Dehn. – [Deby] Here. – [Clerk] Kathy Hinkfuss has to be excused and Melanie Parma has to be excused. – I guess, bottom line, we got a quorum. Approval of the agenda
for today’s meeting. Matt and Barbara. – [Barbara] Second. – All those in favor of, say aye. – [All] Aye. – Agenda approved. Approval of minutes from
our July 4, 2019 meeting. – [Barb] Second. – [Gary] Most immediate by Matt. Second by Alder Doriff. All in favor saying aye. – [All] Aye. – [Gary] Minutes are approved. Order of business. Consideration of possible action to approve preliminary concept plan for Shipyard at 100 West Mason Street tax parcel 2-78. – All right. So, I’m gonna try to do a presentation. – [Barb] Okay, just give me one second. – [Kevin] Somewhere. Over here. – [Barb] Okay, so sorry. Just give me. Hold on. – [Kevin] Hot mic? All right. Ready to go. So, what I’d like to do today. As you know, we’ve been
working for quite some time on the Shipyard redevelopment plan. Had some fits and starts. Different ideas. Things come and gone. But I think we’re on track to
really, as we’ve talked about, make this a premiere recreational
entertainment facility for the community. And also provide an opportunity for entrepreneurship at this spot. And then also stimulating
investment in the neighborhood and for the redevelopment. So, we actually have a number of items that deal with the Shipyard today. But, first, I wanted to go over and get RDA’s direction
in terms of moving forward on a plan for the RDA
piece of the Shipyard. The south side of the slip. And so, just a little bit of history. This is probably about a year ago. We had talked about. All right, baseball team left. We’re not gonna be able to
build the stadium there. What are we gonna do with that site? And so, RDA directed staff
to work with a consultant. We contracted with Cunningham
out of Minneapolis. And really kind of talked through what could this space potentially be. And we walked through and
basically got our arms around this concept of providing
more amenities at the site. And, you know, as you saw
through some of the renderings, the focus was still on
this Field Stadium concept that initially could be
used for smaller events. But reserved space to be able to grow into a stadium in the future. But then also looked at
some waterfront amenities. And really was the first
iteration of this concept we call the container park. You know, kind of this area. We’ve thought about providing a space for pop-ups, entrepreneurs. Especially in food, beverage, and retail. You know, and having this
space in the community. But here’s a way to get them involved. Provide them that spot
right in between the garage and full brick and mortar establishment. And, really, tying to that entrepreneurism that was in our community. And so, we basically
kind of took this concept and, through the last few months, have been working, both
internally and externally, with the public, to
refine this, really, into. The next step is to create some documents for construction to actually move forward and then build this. So, a few of the things that
we’ve found in our discussions using this concept plan. One, too much wide open space. That there was a feeling that, okay, this was really just kind
of a single use field. And, if it wasn’t being used, this place is gonna feel really empty. Great when there’s an event there. You know, if you’re
playing football or soccer or having other some type of festival. But, when it wasn’t occupied, it was almost too open and too vast. Other than that, there really wasn’t a ton of public support. People weren’t looking
for additional places, really, to play sports. Secondly, the parking. You know, there’s a
lot of surface parking. A lot of this area. I mean, it’s prime waterfront area was dedicated to parking. And we felt, given that room
under the Mason Street overpass and in the adjacent Broadway District and we talked about
building some parking lots, really, in that wedge between
Broadway and the railyard, there wasn’t a need for as much
surface parking on the site. This could be a higher and better use. I think we’re trying to
balance providing some parking to allow people who are
unfamiliar with the site to get there and easily access it. But that could be provided
in a better spot, maybe, than right on the site itself. And then the third was this container park and some of these waterfront amenities. I mean, people really
were excited about this. It was something new. And they wanted to see more of this. More things, more activities. And, really, this first step, we moved from a sports field and a stadium to a multipurpose kind of functional area. And I think people wanted
to see even more of that. More reasons to go. Really appeal to a wider range
of ages and demographics. So, the last few months,
we worked with Stantec. We have contracted with them to provide consulting services. Really to figure out how to
develop this concept plan. Refine it. And move into something that is really going to be
great for the community. So, here is where we are at as of today. And I just want to walk through some of the elements where we’ve been and where we’re coming to today and what we hope to do moving forward. So, some of the features on here. You’ll see that big athletic field has morphed into what
we’ll call the Great Lawn. And, instead of being a flat surface, it’s a gently sloped surface to allow for better use for festivals and concerts. You’ll see, at the lower left hand area, there’s a spot for setting up a stage. Our hope here is to
still have major concerts and festivals that attract
five, 10000 people on this spot. Right south of the stage
is a little lookout area. To kind of get a view of the
river and the downtown area. As you’ll see in the. Now, I know the
orientation’s a little off. But the bottom right corner, which would be the northeast corner, we refined some of those
waterfront amenities. So, putting in some sand
for a volleyball court, an urban beach. Having a space for a splash
pad or a play fountain. Also an area for just lounging
with hammocks and canopies. For being in this area. As you work your way into
the cove from the west, we have some reserved
space for a playground. This isn’t gonna be the playground that you find at any of
our parks in the community. We really want something
cutting edge, artistic. So, we were thinking something like Maggie Daley Park in Chicago or the Container Park in Las Vegas or Domino Park in New York City. I mean, these are things that are gonna draw crowds in terms of being something totally different. Then, also, up near the western
edge, we have a dog park. People like dogs. And looking for spaces,
especially on the West Side. So, we feel this is a way that, if you’re coming here
just for the dog park, you can come in and use it. But, also, just a way to
introduce animals into the space in a good way that really flows. And, again, have another destination for dog owners in this area. And then at the far west
end is our Container Plaza. That’s our container park
where we’re gonna have a set of containers set up. Again, structured in different ways. Different build-outs. Some with a kitchen. Some just for a bar. Some just for retail space. Some just for hanging
out or shelter space. And then tying that into a
beer garden up in that area, really, to kind of create this
open air market plaza feel that becomes a destination for food, beverage, and entertainment. And then, also, just kind
of following along the cove, we’d like to do some
environmental restoration at the west end of the cove. We’re looking at some options
for wetland restoration. And, also, throughout, as you go around the breakthrough side on the north end of the slip, having that public pathway
all the way through and working on this naturalized edge. We felt it’s really important for people to be able to get down to the water. To touch the water. If you’ve been out there right now, you don’t have to go down very far to get to the water. But, you know, again, over time, those lake levels will go down. But really providing some access. There’s not a lot of great public access for West Side residents. So, we really felt it was important to provide those opportunities
to get down to the water. For fishing. Also see the arena and the kayak launch. To really kind of integrate this site into the water, as well. So, I just kind of want to take, then, just a quick tour through. What some of these are looking like. Just went through some of those. So, one, this urban beach area. People are really supportive of areas just to kind of go and relax. This is not gonna be like
the beach at Bay Beach. You know, this is more
just kind of designed to be an element of surprise, kind of, in an urban context. We got all the sand and
umbrellas and things. So, providing this area
just to kind of go hang out. Whether it’s parents or kids. You’re bringing food down here and just kind of relax
down by the waterfront in a playful space and a space that really fits
in to the rest of the area. Behind and to the left, you kind of see an area in the trees. Our hope is to get a lot of
mature trees in this area and provide some shade. Putting in some hammocks and canopies. Another place to relax or
picnic and enjoy the site. At the top, we’re looking at
creating a beer garden concept. I think that’s been popular
in other communities. We have a few in the city. But I think important
in terms of providing that social space, that community space, and really tying the
container park into the water. And that important area where you can have beverages responsibly. Do it with a family. But then also take advantage of the rest of the amenities
that are at the site. In here, too, you’ll
see just placeholders. We really feel it’s important to get public art into this site. So, we’ve identified a lot of locations for that public art. You can see there’s red dots all over. Really kind of at the entranceways. Prominent vistas. And just really making sure
that we incorporate art into the site. Like we’ve done on the
east side of the river along the trail there, as well. And then, finally, the container plaza. Again, I think this is a unique amenity that doesn’t exist here in the community. And really like to build
something substance. And really kind of
stacking these containers. Providing restaurant/beverage
space on the first floor. Retail space. And also providing space
for just relaxing, lounging, or potentially even rentable space. A lot of decks and open plazas that you could use for either
concerts or festivals or just every day. So, this is early. Again, this is just a concept. It’s not gonna look exactly like this. But kind of gives you a sense of the size and scope of what
we’re looking to build here. Kind of going back to some
of our earlier conversations. Given some implementations of a site with the environment and the geotech. Putting containers on the site. It’s a lot easier build. And also a little more flexible
in terms of the future. How we want to shape things forward. So, again, all together, we really feel this is maximizing the use of this space. It provides amenities for all sorts of different demographics to
be able to use this site. And really kind of flow together and interact in a good way. And this is just kind of stepping back. A view to see how it all flows together. So, with that, we’d like to
present that before you today and get some direction for
continuing to move forward on the path. We’re having an open house,
I believe, next week. Is that correct? Next Wednesday. We’re gonna be at the farmer’s
market Wednesday night at Old Forte Square. Kind of getting some additional
feedback from the public. Is this what you said you wanted? And kind of making those fine tuned tweaks before we start moving into the phase of designing for construction. – I know you’re gonna get a lot of input from the neighbors, et cetera. What type of numbers are we talking about, as far as people providing input? Were you able to get a lot of input? – [Kevin] So far, I think,
if you count the people that came to our public
meetings, did surveys, all the other contexts, we’re probably over a thousand. – Very good. Good. Good representation. – [Kevin] Yeah, and I think it was really. I don’t have the exact numbers. But, when we had one of our open houses down at the Cup of Joy, there were actually a lot of residents and business owners from the neighborhood. The ones who are gonna be
directly impacted from it. I think that was really
important to get their feedback. I know our team here
has done a lot of work in the neighborhood
going from door to door. Both with businesses and the residents. As we talk about some of the
other items on here today. So, we’ve really been engaged
with the neighborhood. And we feel that another opportunity to provide some comment, but we are moving forward with what the public wants to see here. – Can you go back to your
original picture? First one? Yeah, that one. The walkway along the river,
to me, is so important. So, I see it to the right
and it goes all along there. And it goes around the slip. I presume it goes to the left, as well. The walkway. – [Kevin] Yes, so, it will
go all the way around. So, you’ll be able to access the walkway. I didn’t talk a ton here. But underneath Mason Street is where we’d like to do some
of the parking spaces. We think there’s enough
room for over a 100, probably 120, spaces underneath there. So, to be able to access it, whether they’re walking
or driving, from Broadway. You can come in under Mason Street. You can come down Arndt Street. Or on the breakthrough property. Or you can come down Bridge Street. So, there will be three opportunities. And those all will be interconnected. I will say I went back and forth a lot with the bridge over the slip. Bridge might look cool. But it could also be expensive. It could also inhibit movements of boats and other traffic in and out of there. With that, it’s really
not that far of a walk around the edge in terms
of where you’re going. I think, depending on where you come from, it’s nice to have kind of
that out of the way walk in terms of providing some more coverage. Some shorefront into that area. So, that’s why we left it out. That might have been talked
about in some earlier plans. – [Gary] RDA members. Or, actually, I have no problem opening it up to the public, if that’s what the group wants to do. Matt, you must have a question. – And I do, Gary. So, just first, this
plan is really different than I think what was started
with in the first concept. And I’m assuming it got there
through public hearings. But would probably like
to hear a little bit more about how it got shaped
through that process. ‘Cause that, to me, is
just really important that the concept is there because. – [Kevin] I can talk a little bit about. I’d say probably the biggest morphing came from the first public
meeting that we had, which was winter of last year. Is that December? So, right before the holidays. And, basically, that is a large meeting. Stantec helped facilitate it. And we had six, eight
stations around the room looking at the different elements. And, from that, people could go on and put little stickers on
things they’d like to see and rank things that they
didn’t want to see there. And then, also, there was a survey that was sent to business
owners, hard copy, and then published online. We got a lot of responses from that. A lot of it was photo preference survey. So, we’d show an image of a
certain type of playground. And people would say I
really want to see that here or this totally doesn’t belong here. And so, through that, how
many survey responses. – [Man] Over 600. – [Kevin] Okay, a pretty
substantial amount. And, when we started compiling the data, things started to sort themselves out and we kind of rank ordered what people wanted to
see and what they didn’t. So, some of the things that
went to the side in winter. People didn’t want to
see snowmobiles and ATVs and that kind of heavy use. But then, in some of the summer sports, people really didn’t favor
another athletic facility. People said, “I really don’t
care about playing sports.” I think, if you look. And, again, I talked about
this before about demographics. Most don’t have kids. And so, if you’re talking
about soccer moms and dads who are gonna come and watch, it’s a very small demographic. And we have other facilities that can handle those types of uses. And people were looking for things that we just don’t have,
necessarily, in the city. So, based on that public
meeting and those surveys, that really made us internally
have some discussions. And we discussed internally
in our projects teams. And we discussed with the
mayor’s development team, in terms of the department heads, about starting to shift a little bit away from an initial stadium. And I think we got some support from that. Both seeing, one, listening
to what the public wanted. But then also part of
the challenge in this is. We’re just talking about the plan here. But long term operation and maintenance. And we didn’t know that, if we could, like we had previously,
find that long term, high paying tenant to
use that sports facility. And, for us, that was a lot of risk placed on just one element of it. So, instead of just relying on one tenant to come in and help
support paying the bills in terms of for a football
team or a soccer team or other things like that, we really felt that
was too much of a risk. And so, that kind of
supported the decision to move towards more of
this mixed use space. You know, take the sports out of it. People still wanted festivals. They still wanted concerts. And so, that’s why we
still have this lawn space that can be designed for that. – And then my other question would be it’s easy in July to think
about the use of this space and the way it’s set up. Was there a discussion about winter? – Yes, so, some of the things that we’ve talked about, as far
as the container plaza goes, how that can be designed
and built and oriented to have winter functions. Be open in the winter. I mean, initially, just starting with Christkindlmarket kind of concept of being open even longer. We’ve talked about
having areas for skating. Even on the Great Lawn or,
potentially, even in the slip. We’ve talked about other
events and festivals we could do here in the winter months. If we maintain it right, I mean, the dog park could even be open. Maybe not going to be
doing so much volleyball and beach stuff. But, in terms of having some of these other winter festivals that we have, this would be another outlet for it. It probably won’t be as much programming as spring, summer, fall. But, yes, that was given
some specific consideration to doing things in the winter months. – [Gary] Alderman Johnson, I’d very much appreciate your comments. – [Woman] Give me a second. Okay. – Thank you, Gary. A couple things. First off, I want to really thank staff. For those not aware,
this is in my district. And this is a project that I’ve worked very closely with staff. And I really want to commend them, because they put a lot of
time and effort and energy to really understanding
what the public wants and what their needs are, as well. And they’ve been very
responsive to that feedback. As you guys saw from the rendering that’s been presented today, it is dramatically different than what was first brought forward. While some of the
amenities might be similar, the overall layout and
design is very different. So, I think that’s a credit to the staff for really listening to the public and to the neighborhood for what’s really needed in that area. So, and I think what’s important is, when I look at this site, a couple things. One is. And I just want to add that they’ve actually kept me in the loop. And I’ve been a part of
a lot of the meetings. And so, it’s been very refreshing to see our ability, I guess, to really
be a part of that process. And so, I want to thank
staff for that, as well. But a couple things. One is what I like about
the facility is that not only does it serve as a venue that can attract people into that area, but, more importantly, it
serves as a great amenity for the neighborhood. And so, you’ll see things, you know, with the play areas,
with the open grass area, the park access to the waterfront. Those are all things that
the residents of that area would thoroughly enjoy. In addition to folks that
might go out of their way. I really appreciate the
incorporation of public art. Public art is something
that Green Bay’s been a little slow to catch onto. But I think you’re starting
to see a lot of momentum built around that. Every great neighborhood,
every great district that you see across the
country starts with public art. And so, I think it’s a
really great thing to see the level of commitment to public art. The container park has always been a source of interest of
mine for a few reasons. I think, most notably, the
initial rendering that came out. Kind of just, hey, let’s
plop six containers here. And I don’t think that,
from my perspective, that six containers was enough of a draw for that facility to
really make an impact. And so, again, I applaud staff for really being receptive and
listening to that feedback. Not only from the public. But I probably gave them
an earful many times about how I think we need to create some additional density down there. And I think that, while
the container park, at this point, is just a rendering, they’ve, again, been very
responsive to that feedback and understanding that, if you don’t have the density there, that it won’t create
the level of attraction that you want to see out
of this level of investment from the public. Just a couple things. And, of course, it’s like anything. You create this wishlist. You can’t necessarily
have everything you want. But a couple bits of feedback. When I look at the beach. And, of course, it’s tough
to visualize on a map versus what you see in real life. On the map, I wish the
beach was a little bigger. But, in real life, I’d
have to really lay it out to determine if it’s got
a large enough footprint to serve as that attraction. The staging and infrastructure. I know I did talk to Kevin with this. And, Kevin, I did see that
you did move the stage compared to where it was initially. I just really want to make sure that we’re consulting some folks to determine if that is the appropriate
location for the stage, because, for those involved
in large scale events, it’s not just, hey, put the stage there. It’s really you gotta
have great access points, access to permanent power, which I think is really
important at this site. And I know Kevin has
listened to that feedback and has acted appropriately so. But it is just a thing
that I do want to point out is the location of that
is really important. I really do appreciate the
removal of the athletic field. I think the feedback
from the public was that this wasn’t something
that was of high value. And so, I like the alternative
that’s been presented. It gives us a lot more options for programming throughout the year. And I think that’s an important piece as we look to make this
a year round facility. You want to be able to do that. And that’s another thing
with the container park that I’ve been very adamant about is wanting to see year
round containers, as well. So, that’s gonna mean things like heating and insulation and all
that additional investment. But I think, long term, it
will serve the community much more effectively. And then I guess the last
comment that I would make is I think, when I look at Leicht Park, Leicht Park is a bit of a nuisance in terms of the amount of geese that patronize that area. And they leave little gifts behind for us. And so, I think it’s
really important that, as we look at this site, that we try to be proactive about addressing that from a
maintenance perspective. And my hope is that maintenance is more than just let’s send someone out to pick up goose droppings every day. My hope is that we can take a look at some strategies that have been implemented in other communities
from a design perspective to keep those visitors out. And, in particular,
just a consultant that, an, expert, I should say, that I consulted just the other week was, a lot of times, having
a border or a barrier that separates the water
from your grass area and disrupts that visual is oftentimes what can do that. And so, I know that, on the original plan, we’ve got some trees there. I think it might be worthwhile
to at least consider or do some additional consulting on what that would look like if, maybe, we removed those trees and had some type of
visual barrier to the water to keep the geese from landing and enjoying the facility
without paying taxes. – [Gary] Thank you. – There are. – Just to echo a few of the
comments that were made. I appreciate Alderman Johnson’s comments and the presentation
provided by Doctor Vonck. Thanks to staff for all
of their involvement. You know, it’s notable, I think, the evolution that has taken place with regard to this plan. And so, it’s a real credit to staff to sort of trust the
input that they received. Both online and in person. And really act on them. I think, to some extent,
the multiuse sports facility was a bit of a hangover from what was thought to be possible there. So, just a credit to all involved, alders and staff and the former mayor, to kind of trust what was
being presented to them and move forward with a
slightly different vision. Also, just to make the point that this has a potential to
be much more productive, from a tax increment perspective, as well, than, obviously, a multiuse field. If this container park is as
successful as we hope it to be, I think we have the opportunity to have a number of different tenants offering all kinds of different
businesses there to the public. So, I think that is
certainly notable that, hopefully, we’re going to
be generating more revenue than we might have with
the previous design. But very excited about this concept. Very supportive. Looking forward to more input, though, from RDA, from public, from council as we move down the path. – [Gary] Deb, Barbara Dorff, comments? – I love it. And I’ve been excited about
it from the beginning. And now I’m even more excited about it. And I’m so happy. One thing I wanted to
see was a water feature. Because I know that’s
something that people love. With Red Smith construction this summer, there’s no water park. And that’s been really
concerned for people. People love those little
water pump things. So, I’m really excited. Will it be done by next year? – So, that is our hope. If you noticed, we were supposed to start moving dirt out there. But it’s been a little wet. Which is the whole purpose of why we’re moving dirt out there to get it out of the floodplain. But, if we are able to kind of get our arms around the concept and you get Stantec to really kind of move this into
construction documents, yes, our hope that we will be able to move forward with that and
have this open next year. – [Barb] Pretty awesome. – I’m glad that there was a
look at future demographics in consideration for what you’re doing. Because it’s estimated by,
I think, by the year 2030, 83% of households will be childless. So, yeah, I mean, it’s
a really big statistic. I mean, I know that from looking forward to developing housing. That type of thing. But, also, who’s going
to be patronizing this as years go by. So, I think it’s a really great move. – [Gary] No other questions or
comments? Entertain a motion. – [Barb] I move to approve. – [Matt] I will second that. – Alder Dorff, move to approve. Matt, second. Any other questions or comments? Yes, Deb? If not, we shall vote. – [Deby] Is it coming up?
– No, it’s not connected. So, Deb, Jessie will have to tell you. – [Deby] Okay. – There you go. – [Deby] There we go. I’m in. I mean, it just came up. – Unanimous. Very good. Thank you. Thanks for everybody’s input. Excellent job, staff. Very exciting. Number two, consideration
of possible action to draft and negotiate
management agreements for the Shipyard at 100 West Mason Street tax parcel 2-78. – So, one of the things that came up, has been talked about during this process is looking at responsibilities for operation and
maintenance of the facility. I know we looked at some
different agreements with past opportunities. But I really wanted to
kind of explore with RDA the approach that we
should take with that. Because it does involve
potential negotiations. It would probably be most
appropriate to do that in a closed session to get some direction on how we’d like to take that approach for the management agreement. What’s that? Okay, yes, and we will adjourn to 210 for a closed session for this. – [Gary] Okay, a motion
to go in closed session. – [Barb] Move to go into closed session. – [Deby] Second. – [Gary] Alder Dorff and Deb. All those in favor signal by saying aye. – [Kevin] You’re gonna
have to read the language. – [Gary] Oh, language. I’m sorry. Yep, please. – The authority may
convene in closed session pursuant to sections
19.85(1)(e) Wisconsin Statutes for the purposes of
deliberating or negotiating in the sale of public properties, invest in the public funds, or conducting the other
specified public business as necessary for competitive
or bargaining reasons. The authority then may, thereafter, reconvene in open session pursuant to section 19.85(2)
Wisconsin Statutes to report the results of the closed session and consider the balance of the agenda. – [Gary] Roll call. Gary, yes. Alder Dorff. – Yes. – [Gary] Deb. – [Deby] Yes. – [Gary] And Matt. – [Matt] Yes. – [Gary] So, we are in closed session. – [Barb] Move to return to
a regular order of business. – [Matt] Second. – [Gary] Alder Dorff and Matt. All those in favor say aye. – [All] Aye. – [Gary] We’re back to regular business. Just to report the out. We reviewed the various
options and alternatives to maintaining the park. And we gave staff our input. And they’re gonna proceed accordingly. So, until there’s anything else to decide, that’s kind of where we’re at. Thank you. All right, item number three. Consideration of possible action and implementation of
a curb appeal program for the Shipyard investment strategy. Oh, there he is. Hi. – [David] Here’s okay? Hi. – [Gary] Are we recording? – [Deby] Yes. – All right, I don’t
know if you all remember. I’m David Buckman. Planner with the city. I work with multiple staff members to kind of develop a new program. Sticking with the Shipyard theme. But this is into the neighborhood. So, what you have in your packet is sort of even our internal document. So, it kind of goes deeper into processes. But it’s basically the Green
Bay Curb Appeal Program. And it is an implementation item of the Shipyard Investment Strategy, which was approved last year. Basically trying to set some guidance for the million dollars
the city plans to invest in the neighborhood over
the next three years. So, one of the implementation items was to research and identify
gaps in existing programs and basically close those gaps. And one gap that we have found in the city is a program to address minor repairs and site improvements or site maintenance. We have major programs. Community development block grant and some neighborhood enhancement
that do larger projects. So, if you need to redo your whole house or that type of thing. But small things make a huge difference. And curb appeal. Sort of the name of it. Curb appeal kind of lends that to what I’m talking about. You know, some landscaping,
some minor painting, fixing of a small part of your porch. All those things, collectively,
in a neighborhood, really improve the aesthetics. The desirability to be outside
and be social and be active. It kind of promotes a lot of the stuff that we’re looking to do in the Shipyard. The Shipyard neighborhood, I should say. So, we did develop this
program to fill that gap and to meet that objective. And I guess I want to point
out it’s not a cure all. Again, this is for little things. It’s an incentive program. An assistance program. It’s not really meant to come in and fix all the problems. It’s to encourage you and assist you in doing what you probably
want to do anyway. But maybe can’t afford to do it. So, it is a grant program. But it’s a matching grant program. So, the homeowner, or
property owner, I should say, would have to match 25%
of the grant amount. I’ll get to what those are in a second. I’ll try to keep this short. But it would be available to
all residential properties. Both owner properties and rentals. Regardless if it’s one
unit, two units, four units. Again, the goal is to improve the aesthetics of the neighborhood. Improve the properties. So, whether that’s ownership or not doesn’t really make too
much of a difference. It is limited to the Shipyard area itself. And in your packet on page two. There’s sort of a map that
shows the Shipyard area. So, I won’t get into heavy detail. But it’s the neighborhood just west of the shipyard formal. And why. There’s some kind of discussion of why would we require a match and just not be a straight grant. There are several reasons for that. One is to ensure
responsibility of the funds. Grant programs. Easy to take grant money. And just take it, take
it, take it, and use it. But it also generates that. So, it generates that
property owner buy in. If they’re investing 25% in their rehab or their site improvement, it kind of gets a little
more skin in the game for them, as well. And, also, we want to show that block grant money and
neighborhood enhancement money are leveraging additional
investment in our community. So, that 25% is an additional leverage. So, we can actually come back to the RDA and report this much
investment has leveraged this much additional investment. And what we’re really
hoping for, as well, is, even though the grant
amounts are gonna be capped, people are gonna be
doing more improvements. And, in most cases, you start seeing your
neighbors doing something, you tend to want to do something. And it’s a snowball effect. I mean, that is an overall goal that this just kind of takes a
life of its own, as well. But this is sort of the start. So, it is a capped grant program and it goes into three categories. So, one is landscaping. And that can be your lawn,
planters, flowerbeds, trees or shrub removal, or
pruning, or installation. And that’s capped at $1000. So, these are tiered as they kind of go up as complexity and the
cost of the projects go. The next is exterior
building or structural rehab. And that can be for your primary building or accessory buildings. That would be $2500 cap on that grant. That could be things as simple
as painting and staining. A portion or the whole house. Doing some structural
repairs, like reroofing, putting on a new porch,
fixing sunroom, whatnot. And then the third one
would be site improvements. And that is a $5000 cap. And those are mainly for your
concrete work or asphalt work, walkways and steps, driveways and aprons. But also stuff like fencing. Again, these are limited to the Shipyard. And the other caveat is they have to be visible from the street. You can’t be doing things
on the back of your property to get the grant. You can have that as part of your project, if you’re siding your house anyway. Still get the grant if
you’re doing the back. As long as you’re doing the
sides and the front, as well. Or at least one of the sides or the front. A lot of the work in this
grant program, as well, the way it’s structured, could be done by a homeowner themselves. Painting, landscaping. So, it’s a reimbursement. You would have to purchase the product or hire the laborers to do it. Bring us the bills and
we would reimburse you. So, when you look at sort
of the process in here, there’s a big detail on the stages. The pre pictures, the
application, the progress reports, and then the follow up from staff to make sure it was done
properly and all that before you get reimbursed. That is basically the nuts
and bolts of the program. It’s in a lot more
detail in what you have. The only other thing I
would like to add is that, right now, this is Shipyard only. And it is tied to the investment
strategy and those funds. If we see great success in this program, this could be something that could be expanded
throughout the community. So, really kind of think of it as a pilot. First year. First time something like
this is happening in the city for these types of purposes. And could be tweaked. But hopefully could be expanded. So, if you have any questions. – [Gary] Sounds like a
very practical program. Is it modeled after something else? – There is models all over the
country of different names. – [Gary] I figured. Deb. – [Deby] No, I’m just saying
there’s lots of models. They’re very, very effective. – [Gary] Yes, yes. – I love the part where you
have some skin in the game. So, you’re paying with the grant. I’m sorry. I was getting some help. But I looked at all the things that people have to submit and such. And I’m a very nice person. And that seemed like, okay, that’s a lot. And everybody isn’t. And so, is there somebody that can hold people’s hands along the way to try to help them with all the pertinent information
for reimbursement? The photo documentation,
the copies of receipts, that kind of thing. – Oh, definitely. And it’s no different than we do with our home rehab programs that
are currently in operation. I mean, we have staff, Ken, Kevin, Krista. There’s Stephanie. There’s a lot of staff that
help people through the process. I mean, people come at different
degrees of sophistication. Sometimes they need a
little bit more handholding. And it sounds like a lot. But pictures aren’t that hard to take. Especially nowadays
with phones and whatnot. And we’ll learn from this
first year of doing it. If things need to be tweaked next year, that’s kind of what a pilot’s about. – I just want to make
sure people are helped. That’s my main thing. Because I think it’s
very, very good program. I really like it. – [Gary] It’s a program with
a lot of incentives, really. For 25% investment, you’re getting. – [David] Even something
as simple as landscaping. $1000 of landscaping. You’re only paying $250. I’d do that. I don’t live in the Shipyard. Maybe I’ll move just because of that. I need a new driveway. – [Gary] Questions or comments? – Actually, I’ve got a
question or comment to that. And that’s probably more
the way I was thinking. This was very generous. And I hope it’s wildly
successful and we love it. Are we concerned at all
about it getting abused? And here’s the scenario
that runs through my head. There is a contractor who understands the program is in place and starts knocking on
doors in a neighborhood. Hey, by the way, I can get you. For $200, I can get
you $1000 of work done. And their price is very inflated. And just, literally,
the next thing we know, we’ve got a contractor
submitting 500 projects in the neighborhood. And I’m probably. But you get the gist, right? Because it’s so generous,
I am a little concerned about the opportunity for abuse. – Well, I mean, there always is that. But, from, again, from a staff standpoint, we deal with hat right now with
our contractors with rehab. I mean, our staff is pretty
educated in what things cost. And, if numbers are coming in
heavily inflated or deflated, depending on the scenario, we catch those. – [Matt] Does this process
give you the ability to screen that up front? – Yeah, they would have
to supply their bids prior to it being approved. The grant being approved.
– [Matt] ‘Cause that, to me, is the only drawback that I can see. And I’m glad it’s a pilot. But I think it’s very generous. – Yeah, well, the goal
is to make an impact. And to spend a million dollars. So, we purposefully made it generous. So, yes. Hopefully, it’s a great success. – [Gary] Any other comments? Yes, Alderman Johnson. – It’s just another project that I really want to commend staff on. I know that they’ve put a
lot of hard work into this. And I appreciate them, as well, having me involved with this process. And the one thing in particular that I want to point out with this is, oftentimes, what you see on the front page are the significant investments. And, while we are
looking at some of those. I mean, obviously, the
Shipyard and the riverfront is certainly case in point of that. But we’ve also looked at some
larger purchases in that area. Maybe buying a home or
redevelopment of a home. That can sometimes take up a
little bit larger price tag. Oftentimes, it’s the collective impact of many small projects that can transform a neighborhood. And so, what I really value
about this particular program is that we didn’t just rest on one idea. Staff has come up with other ideas. There are several others, I know, that haven’t been released publicly yet that they’re working on that I would anticipate you’re gonna
see in the very near future. But what I like about this is it creates an accessible opportunity for all of those that
live in that neighborhood. The other component, I think, that, David, when you first proposed
this that there was. I don’t wanna say pushback. But some people were like, “Hey, what about this.” Which was the allowing
of rental properties to be eligible for this. And I think it’s important to note that probably more than 50% of the properties within this footprint
area are rental units. And so, for us to completely
leave them out of the program, I think, would be a mistake. Our goal is to beautify the neighborhood. Which includes every property. So, I am grateful that
we did include that piece within this plan, as well. – [Gary] With all those comments,
I’ll entertain a motion. – [Barb] I move that we move
forward with this program and approve it. – Motion by Alder Dorff. – [Matt] I’ll second it. – Second by Matt. All those in favor say aye. – [All] Aye. – Opposed. So carried. Excellent. Thank you. Thanks for all your hard work. Number four, consideration
of a possible action and resolutions to designate the Redevelopment Authority to perform all actions necessary
for creating, amending, and/or closing tax incremental districts TID 5, 7, 8, 9, 12,
13, 14, 17, 22, and 23. I know there’s been a
lot of meetings on this. – There has. I don’t know if it’s out of order. But, if you’d like to maybe take up E1. Information about annual tax
increment district updates. I think it might be helpful
for Director Ellenbecker and I to kind of talk through
status of the TIDs. Because that would
explain what we’re doing and why these resolutions are here. – [Gary] A motion to do
E1 before number four. – [Matt] So moved. – [Gary] Matt. Alder Dorff? – [Barb] Second. – [Gary] All those in
favor signal by saying aye. – [All] Aye. – [Gary] All opposed. So carried. E1. – [Kevin] Thank you. – [Gary] I wish Mister Blumrick was here. He’s our TID expert. But we’ll get by. Deby knows all about TIDs. – [Deby] Downloading. – [Kevin] Downloading. Sorry for the super huge files. It’s all these pictures. – [Diana] How about I can get started? Diana Ellenbecker, finance director. Annually, we have a report that’s due to the Department of Revenue. And it’s a recap of what happened for the prior fiscal year in our TIDs. So, what we have is really
a recap of the reports that were submitted to
the Department of Revenue. And, again, we had a
joint review board meeting in the end of June to get
approval on these reports. – [Kevin] So, one of the things that we talk about, in terms of reporting. These are all for year end 2018. So, at the end of the year 2018, it’s basically the status
where things are at. And we have to report out to
the joint review board by July basically the status of where things are. Presenting it here kind of the same report then helps provide some context in terms of why we’re proposing some of the following actions
for these certain TIDs. So, I think what we’re
gonna go through and do is look at each of the
tax increment districts. Director Ellenbecker can talk a little bit about the financial situation. I’ll provide some information on some of the projects that are going on in each of those
tax increment districts. – [Diana] To give you
a real quick overview of the report you have in front of you. Did they all get one of these? – [Kevin] That was in the packet. There was a table that was in the packet. A spreadsheet that lists the TIDs. Talk about year end balance,
increment, expenses, revenues. – [Diana] Great. I just wanted to talk about that report. Every report that was
submitted to the state was a three page report. So, by the time you had all the TIDs, it ends up being a lot of paperwork and it was harder to read. So, we have put a summary together. And that’s the page that you’re seeing. And I just want to explain how it works. All the TIDs are on the left hand side. As you go across, it kind
of shows the creation. The name of the TID, the creation date, the mandatory term date. It’ll tell you what the fund balance was as of the beginning of the year for 2018. Then it shows you the different revenues that came in for that TID. Then it shows the
expenditures for that TID. And then it will show where it ended. The fund balance at the end of ’18. The next three columns are guesses. We do a cash flow and a projection on what we think are some of
our future costs in that TID. And then we also show future revenues. Which includes your tax increment and any other revenues
sources that would come in. And that would show whether or not we believe that this TID will end up with a surplus or deficit. I will start with TID 4 is our first one. If I look at the fund balance
at the beginning of the year, we had about $193000. We had tax increment of about $514000. We had expenditures of mostly debt. And there’s a couple other expenses. Leaving us a fund balance of $180000. So, down slightly that first year. But, as you can see, our future revenues well exceed our future costs. So, this TID actually doesn’t have much growth left in it. I guess that’s where I’m
gonna turn it over to Kevin to talk about the TID. Any questions on the financials on TID 4? – [Kevin] So, this TID really has come up in the last few years as the Washington Commons project. Riverfront, riverside
apartments converted. Originally, it was a condo project. And then it was an apartment project. Now, all those apartments have slowly converted back to condos. As they’ve converted back to condos, they were appraised higher. And it does generate some
additional increment. Part of the costs involved in TID 4 for the Cherry Street ramp. Because that apartment
project uses the ramp. We’re using some of the increment to help pay the debt
service on the Cherry ramp. So, that’s why I know it
was discussed about closure. But that’s why it’s still open. Because you still have a few years left on the debt service for Cherry Street. – [Diana] And we can move on to TID 5, which is one of our older downtown TID. Started off with a negative
fund balance of $900000. We had increment and other revenues that came in for the year.
Increment was almost $8 million. You’re also gonna see a
large other borrowing. This TID is where we borrowed
$2 million for the Shipyard. And it was mostly for land acquisition and also for our environmental
for the Shipyard. And you’ll see expenditures. That’s also where you’re
gonna see the land purchase. Also debt service. So, this TID, because of the borrowing, we did end in a positive fund
balance of about $398000. Again, this is a situation where our expenses are about equal to revenues. So, this has been a lot of improvement that will probably just
end up as a slight surplus. – [Kevin] So, some of the
projects. Pete’s Garage. This project we looked at back in 2016. Redeveloped International
Harvester Building into Pete’s Garage. And then, over the last year, they’ve expanded into the
building to the south. And then provided some
additional build-out. So, we’ll start to see
some of that increment from that project. Watermark, Foxconn
purchased that last year. But, prior to that, ISG had
made an arrangement to move in and now they’re fully built
out of the third floor. So, after this year, we should see some additional increment
for that building, as well. If you recall, we terminated
the development agreement, because they hit their targets. The previous developer hit their targets for getting the assessed value up to where they needed it to be. So, there’s no more incentive in terms of this particular building. But there will be some additional
increment coming from it. And we’ll talk about next
month the Adams Street lot. Or two months. September. Kind of revisiting this spot in terms of putting the
request for proposals back out. But this is a spot where we hope to generate some additional
tax increment in the future. Whether it’s in this TID or a future one. But that’s another spot
where we’re looking for some additional revenue. – [Diana] TID 7 is our Lombardi Ashland. Really, the Tundra Lodge. Original TID. Started at about. Fund balance was about $248000. As you can see, we have tax
increment of about $731000. And our debt service was only
about 250 left for this TID. And the other miscellaneous expenditures. So, at this point, we are sitting at a positive fund balance of about 712. As you see, this is a TID
that’s gonna do very well. It has some future costs
of about $1.4 million. But we have future revenues about 9.4 to the mandatory term date of this TID. TID 8 is Burger and Morrow. That started at about $1.7 million. We had tax increment about $297000. Only debt service about 167. So, we had a positive fund balance. Slightly increased to $1.8 million. Again, a situation where
we have still some debt outstanding on this TID. However, our future
revenues are gonna exceed it and leave us with a nice surplus. 9 is our University Heights. This one hasn’t done very well. We are sitting at about one million 462 as a negative fund balance. We have tax increment of 178. However, we have debt
service that’s over $218000. So, every year, this TID is going slightly farther in the negative. And it’s gonna continue for the remainder, at this point, without future development. It’s kind of status quo. – [Kevin] This one I’ll
talk about at the end, in terms of what are the closure options. – [Diana] Move on to TID 10. Which is on Main and Mason. Had a positive fund
balance of about $444000. Positive increment of about $198000. We had some development
grant or PAYGOs that we paid out about $84000. Some other miscellaneous. Increasing that fund
balance to about $539000. As you can see, there’s very
few expenses let in this TID. About $480000. But we’re looking at future
revenues about $3.2 million. So, this TID has gone well. – [Kevin] One of the things
that is now fully online. Main 1901. Project took some vacant areas. This was their new development. The North Shore Bank, Arby’s,
and the Familia Dental. It’s not completed. That is, like I said,
part of the PAYGO on this. It’s a low one. It’s a minor one. But this is fully online now. So, there was some additional
development in this district. – [Diana] Then we go to TID 12, which was one of our better, best TIDs. Started with a positive fund
balance of $4.6 million. We have about $1.6 million
of tax increment coming in. We did incur some expenses
of about $2.6 million. We bought some land in this area. And we also have some
infrastructure expenses that are happening in this TID. So, the fund balance went
down to about $3.5 million. But, as you can see, we have future costs of about $10 million with future revenues of almost
$20 million in this TID. – [Kevin] Aurora continues
to perpetually expand. And add additional revenues for us. So, they’re providing some increment. Willow Creek Health is now fully online. We had a development agreement with them. They have a PAYGO for two more
years after this, I believe. Two or three more years. – [Diana] Three more. – [Kevin] But they’re fully
online and operational. And then Nature’s Way. – [Matt] It’s a beautiful looking spot. – [Kevin] Right, I can attest it looks a lot better than that right now. Further along. – [Brian] Depends on who you talk to. But it looks a lot more taxable now. – [Kevin] Exactly. A lot more taxable. So, the building’s up. They’re working on the
equipment right now. And that should be fully
online by the first of 2020. – [Diana] Then we go to TID 13, which is our more recent downtown TID. It started as a negative
fund balance of $3.3 million. We have tax increment of
over $2 million in that TID. We have expenditures or
debt service of about 1.5. And some other pilot PAYGOs. And so, that fund balance
is getting slightly better. It’s still negative $3.1 million. With some future costs of
still about $28 million. But future revenues about $45 million. – [Kevin] You heard we had a
little hotel project open up. So, that should be now
fully online and assessed and earning some revenue for the district. Been through before. It’s been performing very well. I’m very excited with that
addition to the downtown. And then associated bank lot. Although not in the TID, that’s one of the things
we want to discuss. We made the purchase with that. Looking at a TID 13 expense, really, to help provide infrastructure needs that are needed in that district. As the KI continues to expand and we have additional
businesses coming into this area. We all know the horizon
for Main Street ramp is not too far away. We need to provide short
term parking solutions. But also long term
development opportunity. Which we’ll talk about
later on on this agenda. But we may look at an amendment to be able to have TID 13
cover this particular facility. – [Diana] We’re going to TID 14, which is our North
Broadway, Larson Green area. Started with a negative fund
balance of about $580000. Some tax increment of 151. We also had some developer agreements that we got some revenue
in of about $208000. Debt service. So, this TID actually went
farther negative of $1.1 million. But this is a situation. This is infrastructure for
on the North Broadway end. And the question is and the decision is do we wanna go borrow, pay interest, or do we go in a negative fund balance and then knowing that
it’s gonna come back out in a couple years. So, this is a situation where
we did not borrow the money. And so, as you will continue to see, if you go farther down
that line for that TID, we still show future costs
of about $7.7 million. But we are looking at
future revenues about 13.7. So, it will end in a surplus. – [Kevin] This TID is, in and of itself, most of the rail yard. Basically east of Broadway
and north of Dousman. So, you can see the buildings
continue to be built out. CMD fully built out and occupied. Now they’re working on the
buildings to the north. RST. And also you’ll see the first
set of condos is going up. And those will be online
by the end of the year. Also, at the north, we talked
about development agreement. TWG for Broadway Lofts. Providing 109 units of affordable housing at the very far north end. They’ll be set to break ground
probably later this summer. And that will be online in 2021. – [Diana] We move on to TID
16. That’s our Military Avenue. That has a negative fund
balance when we started at 583. We have increment of about $271000. Miscellaneous expenses and debt service. Which brought the negative
fund balance down to about 372. Again, situation where future
costs are about $900000. But we have future revenues
about $6.1 million. So, this one just needs some time and it’ll get back into a positive within the next couple years. – [Kevin] What they were
hopeful for in this area. Green Bay Plaza. The owner, last year, has been working on putting together a good tenant mix. As you can see, we’ve
talked about many parcels. Way too much parking than what we needed. That’s helpful. That leaves some
additional developable land out of that parking area. With that, we’ve seen this. Director Ellenbecker said
some other small gains as other small properties
up and down this stretch have been approved. – [Diana] TID 17 is very small TID. It’s at a negative $61000. Small increment. Few expenses. Really relatively flat and very
little activity in this TID. – [Kevin] This is one I talked
a little bit about last year. We’re in a little bit of litigation with the development agreement there. We hope to have that settled
up by the end of the summer. And, with that, then we’ll be
able to close this TID down and fund that gap. – [Diana] TID 18, one
of our more recent ones. Which is our University Avenue. We are starting a negative
fund balance of 937. Tax increment of $328000. We have some large development. Developers grants. We paid out about $761000 in 2018. Leaving us a negative fund balance of 1.4. This is, again, a situation where we make the decision do
we want to pay the grant, knowing the additional increment is coming in the next couple years,
or do we want to borrow? Then we could turn this into a positive fund balance at this point. But then you’re adding the
interest cost for borrowing. This is also another one. We have about $8.3 million of expenses that are future projected costs. And yet we have future revenues of about $17 million to come in. So, this one will end
on a positive surplus based on our projections. – [Gary] What is the latest
of the meatpacking project? – [Kevin] So, they have two buildings up. It took them a little longer. They found, as I talked about before, some surprises in the demolition. Hidden floors with hidden
asbestos in the plant. So, they were a little slower and a little more expensive in terms of taking down the building. They were able to get two units up. They worked out an agreement
with UW Green Bay, actually, to provide some student-focused housing. Which they felt has gone really well. And so, they continue to make progress on. All in, I think the agreement said 340 some units over five years. They’ll probably beat that
in terms of a timeline. But it seems to be going well. Again, the market’s good
for those types of rentals. – [Gary] So, two buildings
are up out of how many? – [Kevin] Initially, I
think I have to look. Eight or nine. I have to
look at the agreement again. There’s about 340 to 360 units all in. I want to say they have just
over 100 online right now. – [Gary] Excellent. – [Kevin] Also in that
area, Festival Foods. Almost fully developed. The grocery store, the small
shopping center, Kwik Trip were all built. And then we’re working right now to plan the last parking lot in there. The temporary parking
lot, the fourth parcel, should have some development
come through this year. Oh, yeah, and then, also, not part of a development agreement, the Kaiser Lumber site. There’s some development going on there. Plans have been approved
to do some development for some additional apartments out back of the very south side. It’s kind of where the
curve is on Clement. The back area there. So, that will be providing
some additional increment. – [Diana] TID 19 is our newest
one. Our East Town Mall. It started with a negative
fund balance of $33000. Just administrative costs
that we started off with. Had a few more expenses in 2018. So, sitting at a negative $57000. But we will have an increment
coming in as of 1/1 of ’19. Again, we actually know
that number already. But this is through the end of ’18. Expected total cost, based on what we know as of
right now, we have $5.1 million. And we think we’ll have
revenues about 10.4. So, at this point, based
on the projections, we’re looking at a positive surplus of about $5.2 million in this TID. – [Kevin] East Town, Cub Foods. Thankfully, it no longer looks like this. If you’ve been up there. Been renovated. Up operating. Partials. Ross, Petsmart are in there. And I think they got their
last tenant of the small space. So, that has been fully done. East Town. We continue to work with
the developers on that. They’ve been informed. We’ll probably have to come back through with another development agreement. We had an original one. Kind of got extended. They’re still actively working on putting together a tenant mix. As you know, retail’s
tough to get that together. So, they’re still
continuing to work on it. But, with that, they know that they’ll probably have to
come back through our bodies to revisit a new development
agreement in terms of. – [Gary] Does the developer
actually own the building now? – [Kevin] Yes, yep. Yep, they’ve owned it for some time. They may have looked at
potentially selling a portion of it to help move forward with revenue to get the project off the ground. So, that could be a potential. It’s a few parcels in there. But, with that, again, any new project would have to come
through this body, again, in terms of the timing expired and also the potential change in scope. – [Diana] I don’t have any
financials yet on TID 20. – [Kevin] So, TID 20 we
just started last year. So, 1/1 of 2018 it became effective. This is our Whitney Park TID. So, just the area to the
east of Whitney Park. It was created to
facilitate the development of a few projects. One, Whitney Park Townhomes fourth phase. So, this is down in Van Buren and Pine. GB Real Estate Investments going through. Taking out some older housing. Then also some properties
that the RDA had. And so, it would be four new
townhomes in its place there. I gotta update my picture
now, because they’re done. 901 Main, right on Main Street itself. The parcel, 20 new apartment
units coming online. Construction’s underway. Those will be done this year. Whitney School is also under
construction right now. The apartments are under construction. There will be 22 apartment units and then 12 townhomes around the back. The apartments should be
complete by the end of the year. And, the townhomes, they
hope to break ground some time in the coming weeks. – [Gary] I understand there’s lots of interest in all those projects. – [Kevin] Yes, there’s a lot. If you’ve been over in that area, you can just stand and look to your left and look to your right. By next year, there’ll be 60 units. Close to 60 new units online. Then, TID 21 we also created
for Green Bay Packaging. If you’ve been out there, you’ll see work is going on. I think most of the
foundational stuff is in. But, as we talked about,
they’ll be building a brand new paper mill. When that’s complete, they’ll
be taking down the old mill. You’ve probably also seen
they made an expansion of their box plant up there. So, still a few years before these is fully completed and online. But that project is well underway. Now, some TIDs that we have talked about and we’ll be talking
about here in the future. TID 22 to create a new
tax increment district for the Shipyard. Basically to encompass
the parcels the RDA owns. And some adjacent ones around it. This is to facilitate the
development of the Shipyard. RPA sits also to facilitate breakthrough in the development of
their new headquarters, which will go on the
north side of the slip. As well as, potentially, some
other projects in that area. And then we also are
looking at creating TID 23. This is down by TID 7. The Lombardi Ashland TID. We like to create this TID. We’ll call it the Legends District. And this is to facilitate
the redevelopment of the old Brett Favre
Steakhouse into the Legacy Hotel. This development agreement
was approved the other month. So, this will be starting
construction within a few weeks after permits are approved. But they would like to be
up and running next year. So, I just put in just kind of an update. I think Diana kind of talked about what we were required to report from the state year over year. I think one of the things
that I always stress is, when we create a tax increment district, we should develop the heck out of it. Because we’re basically
asking these other entities to forgo their taxes for
a certain period of time. And then, when they’re done, they’ll have more taxes
coming back to them. So, it’ll be worth the wait. So, this is just a quick look. Looking at the TIDs that we have currently in existence right now. When they started. When they’re proposed to end. The 2018 fund balance, which is what Director
Ellenbecker sent out in her sheet. You know, it’s negative right now. But one of the things,
again, we’ve talked about is using cash to pay for things instead of going into further debt. I think it just benefits us and it benefits the developer in terms of not racking up those interest
costs if we don’t have to. We’ve been able to
manage that pretty well. Then again, based on the
increment we have coming in, that’s gonna balance back up. So, then, again, trying to
maximize the development. You have the base value of
when these TIDs were created. And, at the end of 2018,
these were the values that were created. So, all in all, you can see that, in our tax increment districts, we’ve created about $350 million
worth of new development. So, again, it’s our job to make sure we maximize those numbers moving forward. And I think our strategy’s
been to be more selective about how we create and where we create our tax increment districts. Doing it not only in terms of boundary, but also in terms of
timing projects out there. So, these are all the resolutions
that we have proposed. And I’ll just run through them real quick. And then, if there’s any questions. And these are really to
be presented to council that would authorize the
Redevelopment Authority to conduct these actions. By state statue, generally, the Plan Commission does
tax increment districts. Within the city, there’s been a history of the Redevelopment Authority doing this, because they’re the ones
who are involved mostly in all the development agreements. And so, with that, by resolution, have the council designate
the RDA to perform these acts. What it does. It doesn’t say we’re going to do them. It just says it authorized
us to explore these options. We’ll have to come back through and talk about resolutions
and things will get voted on. We’ll have a public hearing here. Things will get approved by council and a joint review board
before they become official. What we’d like to consider. TID 5, a territory amendment. Potentially over in the Shipyard. Actually taking some
properties out of TID 5 that are in right now. Those are properties that the city has and don’t have any value in and really has no obligations on them. You can do overlapping TIDs. But trying to make Director
Ellenbecker’s life easier. Not having overlapping
TIDs is financially, generally, easier to track expenses. So, we may look at
taking some of those out to help create that TID 22. TID 7 and TID 8, both
of these are ones where we’ve generally paid off
most of the project expenses or have a good idea of
what the future expenses are going to be. And so, we’d like to explore a process of shutting these down through a sunset. And what that would do is we would like to take any surplus we have in
those tax increment districts and allocate it to TID 9. TID 9 is gonna be expensive to shut down. But we need to shut it down, because it’s not getting any better. And it’s better for us to
use tax increment dollars to fund the gap than it
is to have it come back and have the city put it on the levy. And so, what we’d like to do is kind of set out a period where. We’re still looking at the time table. Whether this would be ’19, ’20, and ’21 or ’20, ’21, and ’22. But, basically, have
an allocation amendment to go in to TID 9. And then we would shut the TID down and pass an affordable housing resolution. The state allows you to keep
a TID open for one year. Put all the increment into
an affordable housing fund. This would be something that we feel could really be akin to our
Neighborhood Enhancement Fund. And really reduce the
borrowing we have to do to get that fund. And really be a good source
of capitalizing the fund. So, we would have the allocation. We would keep the TID open for one year and put all the increment into
an affordable housing fund. And then it would terminate
the year after that. So, we would probably do that for 7 and 8. Some of those funds going
into 9 and help shut it down. Also, the same thing for 12. 12, the only additional
expenses we see out there is we would like to prepare ourselves for the next TID out there and the expansion of
the I-43 business park. And so, as long as that has cash flowing, it has a pretty substantial amount of money in the fund balance. We’ve been using that
to pay for Erie Road. We’ve been using that to
pay for the sewer extension that will enable additional
development out there. So, if we could use that fund, we could start a new TID out there. Basically fresh. And don’t have to go
far in the hole on debt. TID 13, again, as I talked about for the associated bank lot. Perhaps a territory amendment
or a project plan amendment to incorporate that into it. TID 14. A territory amendment to capture. They picked up a piece of the
Canadian National Railroad. So, to extend it. Then we’d like to extend
the TID three years. Really, it sat for two, three
years not paying any taxes and just kind of in limbo in between things with On
Broadway, Walmart discussion. And we really kind of lost time in terms of not having any type of development agreement over there. And so, we’d like to
extend that three years to be able to kind of catch up. And really also help provide some funding to pay for all that infrastructure. As we’ve done on TID 12, we’ve funded a lot of the infrastructure. And TID 14, really, to
turn it into that site, needs that infrastructure to help it develop to its fullest. And then TID 17, as I mentioned, after some litigation issues get resolved, to terminate that. And then creating TID 22 for the Shipyard and TID 23 for the Legends District. – [Gary] Excellent update. I know we ask for this every
year to get a good update. Very good job. Very nicely done. I see Deby is smiling. We can talk about housing. – I’ve been talking about that creation of that housing fund for a while. And I know that the city of Wausau has done some amazing
stuff with their funding that they’ve put aside for
that by using TID dollars. – [Gary] Excellent. Questions, comments. Great, great report. Sorry, I can’t see you. – [Barb] Very comprehensive. – So, we’re back to number four now. This is comments in regard to the report. Number four was the consideration of possible action resolutions of the designated redevelopment to perform all actions necessary for creating, amending, or closing tax district TID 5, 7, 8, 9,
12, 13, 14, 17, 22, and 23. Great background information. Matt. – [Matt] After that excellent report, I would make that motion, Gary. – [Deby] I’ll second. – Okay, motion made by Matt. A second by Deby. Any other questions or comments? If not, we shall vote. Is it coming up? A verbal vote. All those in favor, say aye. – [Matt] Aye. – Opposed? So carried. Just a comment. I really appreciate all
the work you guys did. In particular, all the recommendations. A lot of thought went into that there. I appreciate everybody’s effort. Thanks. Number five. Consideration of possible
action and resolution adopting post-issuance compliance policy for tax exempt conduit bonds. All right, number five. Who’s got that? – So, I can take it. So, this is just a follow up
to the bonds that we passed. The industrial revenue bonds
for Green Bay Packaging. – [Gary] Yes. – In short, without getting
into too much technical, we’ll follow the rules
in terms of compliance moving forward in terms of we act as the compliance coordinator. So, we just have to make sure that it doesn’t impose any
financial obligations on us. It just ensures that, as you
can see in the attachment. Basically, it’s a
resolution documenting that we adopted this policy. – [Gary] Okay, okay. Motion to approve. – [Barb] So moved. – Motion by Alder Dorff. – [Matt] I’ll second. – Second by Matt. Questions or comments? All those in favor signal by saying aye. – [All] Aye. – Opposed? So carried. I guess we’ll do verbal the
rest of the way here. Why not? Consideration of possible action to approve a contract to build a two bedroom home on 900
South Greenwood Avenue and to authorize staff
to sell the property when job is complete. Kevin. – That would be me. So, we acquired the property
at 900 South Greenwood. It was in pretty rough shape. So, we demolished it. And we had this lot available. Ken and Erin put together some plans that we used a design
called Greenwood Design. And, working with Jackie
down in purchasing, we put together an RFP proposal for bids to build this two bedroom
home on this site. And we had two bidders come back. And the low bidder was J.D. Melman. And they proposed to build this house that we’re proposing to sell
after they’re done. So, it’s a turnkey operation. For about $111.66 a square foot. They were our recommended bidder. The references checked out. And we’re looking to have
that done this year yet. And then allow staff to sell the property in the best interest of the RDA. – [Gary] Okay, what do you
think it will sell for? – Well, in discussions with the assessors and our real estate expert, we think in the range of
$80 to $100 a square foot. It’ll be 1800 square foot
property when it’s done. – [Gary] There’s definitely a
shortage of houses out there, everybody tells me. There’s not much inventory. So, I am sure that will sell quickly. – Yes, and this is a new
build in an old neighborhood. So, you know, the sale of this property will be kind of an
experiment for us, as well, to see how it goes. But we’re hoping to get a high value. Properties on North Broadway that were built, sold in the 180s. We’re hoping we can get in that range. – [Gary] Questions, comments? If not, I’ll entertain a motion. – [Barb] Move to approve. – Motion by Alder Dorff. – [Deby] Second. – Second by Deby. If everybody’s. Okay, we’re doing voice vote. So, all in favor, signal by saying aye. – [All] Aye. – Opposed. So carried. All right, number seven. Consideration of possible actions to approve the use of $19994 in community development block grant funds for a proposed Broadway
mural at 123 South Broadway tax parcel 3-113. – That’s me. Okay, so, we received a
request from On Broadway to use their escrow money. Their community development
block grant escrow money from the sale of the parking
lot on Walnut Street. They would like to put a mural on the side of the old
DuBois Formalwear building at 127 South Broadway. And, in your packet, you
have the proposed artist and a design concept of
what they would like to do. We also have Alderman Johnson here, who’s on Broadway, if you have any additional
questions for him in regards to this. But this is an eligible
block grant activity. And it’s an eligible use of those funds that they have set aside
for use on Broadway. – [Gary] That’s a competitive number? To get the work done? – I believe so. – [Gary] Go ahead, Alderman Johnson. – I mean, murals
typically aren’t something you do competitive bidding on. – [Gary] I know, I know. Let me ask another way. – This will be the largest. – [Gary] Will we get
our bang for our buck? – This will be the largest
mural in the city of Green Bay. – [Gary] Okay. – And, yes, for the size
and scope of the project, the intricacy of the design, it’s certainly within reason of what you would expect to
pay an artist for that work. – [Gary] That’s what I wanted to know. Questions or comments? – [Barb] I like it. – [Gary] You like it? – [Barb] Yes.
– I assume that’s a motion. All right, and Deby seconds it. All right, motion by Alder Dorff and second by Deby. All those in favor signal by saying aye. – [All] Aye. – Opposed? So carried. Number eight. Consideration of possible
action to approve a request for proposals for redevelopment of the parking lot located on 200 block of North Monroe Avenue. That sounds exciting. Prime property in the middle of our city. – Yes, hi. On the 200 block. And that is actually an entire city block. It’s currently a parking lot. And we would like to put
out an RFP for development. Most likely a mixed use development. And this is in the downtown plans. The Authenticity Plans. So, we would like to see
downtown development down there. So, we are planning to ask
for submissions by September. And then be able to probably go to the RDA Real Estate Subcommittee. And then bring our
recommendation to the RDA in October for the October meeting. So, this would actually
be the entire city block. And we have, in the RFP. Usually, what we have in there about what they need to submit
and kind of our standards and how they can find out
more information about what our downtown plan says. And how we hope to have residential and mixed use down there. – [Gary] How long would
they have to submit the RFP? – I think they need to. – [Gary] Three months? – Yeah, if it goes out next week, it would be submitted by. Yeah, they need to ask
questions by the end of August. And then submit by September 13. So, it will be out for a couple months. – [Matt] Do we feel
like that’s enough time? – It’s a lot longer than
our more recent RFPs that have gone out. We are adding about
probably an extra month, because it’s such a large
site and very significant. It’s actually. In our plans, we actually
talk about it as a catalyst. So, it’s very. – [Matt] And my just thought is, if a developer just finds
out next week some time and, two weeks later, designs proposals. Excuse me, two months. That actually seems tight
for such a big piece where I really want people
to come with good stuff. I mean, in my head, this is just me. If we gave them another month so that people really have time
to think it through. For me, that’s not a big deal. That’s just. I’m not a developer. – We looked at how much time was spent when we looked at the
Adams lot redevelopment. And we had some pretty
substantial designs. This is a blank canvas. There’s no structure there
to have to worry about. So, we thought it would actually be an easier look at that development. I think we really would like to get a development on that site. And I think that’s why we
took that into consideration. So, I mean, I think, if we
put it out and we get nothing, we could always extend it at that point. But we have had some
interest in this spot. Five people already. And we’ve been pitching a
lot since we purchased it. – [Matt] Okay, I mean, if you feel like that’s enough time for folks. I obviously don’t know what it takes to put a building design together. It just seems like a lot. – I’m hoping we can get some developments. – My understanding is that there’s an alleyway in the middle of that and there’s a lot of public works there. So, how are we bidding it? Two pieces? One piece? If it does get to be one piece, this could be a cost by the city, right? – We talk about, in here, that, probably. Looking into it, it
probably will be likely that we need to keep the alley untouched. So, we suggest in the proposal, if they want to submit plans, it should probably leave the alley open. And that’s good for urban form, too. – [Gary] So, it potentially
could be two different bidders. – If they choose to only do development on one part of the site. – You could do it like
the front facing Monroe and you have that mixed
use lower space retail and then apartments above, potentially. But maybe that backside would be primarily housing development. A higher end housing development. So, that potential is there, as well. – When I go through this, I don’t really see where we’re making a specific commitment by the city, which I think is a good thing. I mean, I’m not disagreeing with it. So, they know going in that we really are not making any. Although we’re obviously quite interested. We would do something. But we’re not promising
them any commitments. – [Woman] No. – Okay, that’s a great thing. That’s a good thing. Thoughts or comments? Staff, anybody. So, how long have we owned it? We haven’t really owned it
that long, have we, Kev? – [Kevin] Ink’s still drying. – I would think it is. What a great opportunity, though. A block right in the middle of the city. All the potential in the world. And a clean block, like you said. Excellent opportunity. I’m sure, Ken, you’re gonna get all kinds of people bidding on this. The whole staff, rather. All right, so, our vote would be that we approve that we do an RFP
on that piece of property. – [Matt] I’d make that motion, Gary, that we approve the RFP for redevelopment of the parking lot. – Motion made by Matt. Second by Alder Dorff. Any other questions or comments? All those in favor signal by saying aye. – [All] Aye. – So carried. Excellent. Thank you. Covered a lot of ground today. And, of course, the E1,
we already talked about. RDA loan update, please. Yes, please. – So, I have not, in my
six years of being here, ever given you any information updating you guys on your loans. So, I thought that it was about time. – [Gary] Great, Matt, you’re
on that committee, right? Matt, you’re on the Loan Committee. – [Matt] Well, is this
the Community Development Revolving Loan Fund? – This entails that and everything else. So, yes, it does include the Redevelopment
Authority revolving loans and also all the home loans
that have been processed. So, in looking at that, I think that our portfolio’s very strong. Some of these loans go
back to the late ’80s. So, this is a look at everything that has happened through the city. We have had defaults, write
offs, and foreclosures. With any loan portfolio, you’ll have that. For our residential, the total of defaults, write offs, and
foreclosures total 7.71%. Which is low. Banks, generally, in a year time, likes to keep theirs at about 5%. But we did have, in
2010, the market crash. Which caused. Most banks had a 21% default rate. So, when you take into consideration that into these numbers, I think that it’s a very strong portfolio. Especially when we are working with people that have limited means. So, that demographic was hit
hard with that crash, also. – [Gary] This is all the loans
the city has outstanding. – Yep. We have 547 outstanding
loans at this point just for residential. And those loans are. A lot of them. Almost all of them, I
believe, are deferred. So, as long as you live in the property or family lives in the property, there’s no payments due and
no interest on those loans. – Thanks for this update. You’re right. We’ve never seen this before. It’s very interesting. Comments or questions? I think we don’t need a
motion. This is informational. Thank you. Great update. Financial report and check register. I went over that. I don’t have any questions
unless somebody else does. Director’s report. Project updates. You guys have been busy. – Yeah, our floor’s been working
hard cranking things out. So, get things done this summer. With that, I did, if the
commission will allow, yield my time. John Mehan is here. Prepared to talk about
potentially refinancing of some of the KI2 bonds, I believe. Nothing committed yet. But just kind of exploring some options. So, he’s going to be presenting to Finance Committee tonight. So, I just wanted to kind
of give you an update of something we may look at in the future. – [Gary] Excellent. Thank you. Motion to open the meeting. – [Matt] So moved. – [Gary] Seconded by Deb. All those in favor say aye. – [All] Aye. – [Gary] Meeting’s open. Thank you. – [Barb] You’re on. – All right, thank you very much. I apologize. I got a little
bit of a raspy throat. But I’ll work through it and answer any questions
that you may have. There are a number of
different issues outstanding related to KI. And I would have to go
all the way back to 1999, which was the first KI issue. And that was a transaction
that went through the RDA. And it has, I guess I’d call it, maybe a bookend transaction. Which was the Resch Center Arena. In ’99. It was supported by
hotel/motel room taxes. Both were ultimately supported by a quiet enjoyment lease with Brown County. So, those issues are outstanding. They’ve been refunded a couple times. And, right now, their current
existence is a 2016 issue. And a 2012. Through Eschwaub CVA
of the 2012 for Resch. And the 2016 through the RDA for the KI1. During this time period, there was a debt issue
that was done in 2013. And you go to my little handout here. I’ll just walk through it. And the 2013 issue, which
is referred to as KI2, was a transaction, really, for the expansion of the KI Center. And the structure was set up
that, through a waterfall, which is how we describe
it in bond terming, is that the hotel/motel
room taxes come in. They’re first applied to
the KI1 and the Resch Center to make those debt service payments. Which expire in 2029. And then they flow through to support the debt service payments
for KI2, the 2013 issue. Well, the 2013 issue was
a taxable debt issue, because of tax laws at the time pertaining to management
contracts, et cetera. Which I don’t think we
want to get into today. Except that they’re a taxable debt issue. They were issued in December of 2013. $24 million issue size. They’re federally taxable. They’re actually state exempt for state of Wisconsin holders. And the structure was set up so that, in the early years, there
were lower payments, ’cause we were working
around the original issues. And then it steps up. And the final payment is in 2043. So, it was only set up with
a 30 year amortization. The interest rates. Because, remember, they
were taxable in 2013. Were from 4.9 to 6.15. I would also say that these were a quiet enjoyment lease structure. That’s why this discussion does
go to the Finance Committee. Ultimately, the Common Council. ‘Cause the lease structure is such that, if there are insufficient
hotel/motel room taxes through that waterfall, that the lease is with the city. And the city needs to make
their annual lease payments. Fortunately, for the life of the issue, that hasn’t been a question. There has been sufficient room taxes in order to make those
debt service payments. Those bonds from 2013 are called in 2023. And there was a change in
the tax law in 2017 that said you could no longer
do advanced refundings. Except of taxable issues. So, what we’re looking at
here is on the next page. Is the possibility of doing a taxable advance refunding of the debt. The issue size, once again,
will be determined to be about $20.7 million, because we’re structuring it not only to pay off
the existing principle. But we have to do fees on a
certain amount of the interest. We’re not extending the debt. It still goes out to 2043. So, it’s the same life. But now the true interest
rate is significantly lower. It has really come down. We’ve watched this on a continuing basis. And floated the balloon. And said, “Well, rates moved against us. Let’s back away.” Rates will go back and forth. Well, now, it’s. And these are approximate numbers. Because, obviously, we’re
not selling debt today. It could reduce the annual debt service by about $160000 a year. Now, I appreciate that. Really, it’s that waterfall again. The hotel/motel room taxes
come down to make that payment. But, ultimately, remember that is a liability of the city. So, what we’re doing is
reducing that liability that would be out there
with about $160000 a year. That, overall, it’s more
than $2 million of savings. The reason this is all
just coming together. If you go to the next page, I just wanted to give you an idea of where treasury rates are. Taxable debt issues are always priced against US treasuries. Investors say, “I could buy US treasury and sleep well at night. Anything that’s not a
US treasury I expect.” What we call a spread to the treasury. Something higher than that. So, you always look to
a US treasury and say, “Whatever that is, as
that goes up and down, the prices of taxable
debt go up and down.” If you look at the chart, we have both a maroon
color and a blue color. And what we tried to do
is, from left to right, when the issues were done back
in 2013, where we are now. And just sort of a point
of interest is that, compared to where we are
now, the current rate, rates have really only
dropped below that a few times over this time period. The past six years. They have come down like this. So, we are looking at it and
saying the trend is right. It may all change in a week. It may change in a month. If I could tell you where rates would be, I wouldn’t be here. (laughter) But it’s a matter of
getting it into position to take advantage of the fact that these rates are falling. When you look at the next page. I appreciate these are a lot of numbers. On the left side, that’s
what the net room taxes are projected to be going
out into the future. That was done by a firm called HVS when the expo financing was completed. That was part of the financing structure. The 2012 issue, which is
really the Resch Center, the 2016 issue, which is KI1, all have first call on that revenue. You can see it’s a significant revenue to debt service amount. So, for example, in 2020, there was projected to be
about $5.6 million of revenue and about $3.7 million of debt service. That waterfall means that
that excess money goes to KI2, the 2013 issue. And so, without any
structuring changes to it, the way it works right now is that there’s significant coverage. There has been to make
the debt service payment on these issues. On the next page, I have
a hypothetical review of, if you keep to the same life, 2043, if you replace the old interest rates with the new interest rates, after all the costs that go with it, your savings is about 160
I think I said a year. All these numbers will change. If I did it tomorrow morning, they’d be different than they are today. But this gives you a concept
of where the numbers flow. At the back, I have a draft time table for action of the RDA. I would say that there will be a come back to you at some point. But, between then and
now, there needs to be not only discussion with the city. Once again, they’re ultimately
on the hook for the debt. But there needs to be the
preparation of the bond documents. Getting to know the attorneys together. Go to the rating agencies. Fortunately, a lot of the material is already under curation. Because the city has
their normal borrowing. The water utility has borrowing. So, there’s already information gathered. Rating agencies are
already having discussions about city debt. Frankly, about this type of debt. So, a lot of this is we’re on dual tracks. But, ultimately, this would come back to the RDA at a future date. – [Gary] More than likely,
time is of the essence? – I’m always one that says,
if I know I’ve got the bird, I take it. I move. I would add that one thing
to be aware of is that, right now, that debt that’s
out there is called in ’23. And so, any refunding we
would change that call date. We would push it out. The investors would
expect more of call date. Will you give that up to
take this money today? And so, that’s one change to it. But, otherwise, it’s
basically the same structure and subject of the city rate, of course. But, yeah, I would convene
the working group now. I would be going right now. And I apologize. I know this has come late. I appreciate Kevin giving
this on the director’s report. I think, with the 4th of
July and everything going on, we probably didn’t get it in your hands as quickly as I should have. – [Gary] Questions, comments? Finance director, you’re
comfortable with this? – Yes. Just one thing to keep in mind. We will have to have
probably some discussion with the county, ’cause it also affects
their whole waterfall that they have designed that this water. Money will roll into their expo hall and then all the documents. I’m not sure if they need
to be updated. Probably not. But we have to keep the
county into consideration. – [Gary] Questions by the committee? Comments? Anything else in the director’s report? – [Kevin] No, that’s enough today. – [John] Thank you. – Excellent. Next meeting is August 13. Motion to adjourn, please. – [Matt] So moved. – [Barb] Second. – Matt, Alder Dorff. All
those in favor say aye. – [All] Aye. – We are adjourned. Thank you.

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