QuestBridge Virtual Event

QuestBridge Virtual Event


>>So, welcome officially to
the QuestBridge Virtual Panel. And thank you, everyone, for joining us. If you are just joining us, my name is Amelia. I am joined by three colleagues. We’ll do introductions. Two you will not see on camera. Brittany and Karen are off camera. They will be helping to answer any of your
questions that you have, which you can submit through the Q&A box at the
bottom of your screen. We’ll also be answering some
questions live as well. We’re joined by four current students who
are QuestBridge scholars here on campus. My name is Amelia Conlon. I am Assistant Director of
Admission here at Princeton. I’ve been here just for about two years now, and
I’m really excited to be working with you guys. And I’m joined by my colleague.>>Hi, everyone. My name is Ricky Canton. I’m an Admission Officer here at Princeton. Like my colleague, Amelia, already said, we’re
really excited to have you guys join us today. Please make sure to type any
questions you may have in that Q&A box. We just really want this to be an
awesome opportunity for you all. So, I’m going to let our
panelists introduce themselves. So, if Josiah, if you could
start, that would be really great.>>All right. Hello, everyone, my name is Josiah Gouker. I’m a first year at Princeton University. I live in Whitman Residential College. I am from Yucca Valley, California. Some of the things I do on campus
are Princeton Club Archery. I admire the bow and arrow. And then I’m also a SIFP Fellow. It’s a Scholars Institute Fellows Program. It’s for low income students. And we do like little support groups and
mentorship activities and stuff like that.>>Awesome. Well, hi, everybody. My name is Kaitlyn Bolin. I’m a sophomore in the Class
of 2021 here at Princeton. I live in Forbes Residential College. I’m from Kings Mountain, North Carolina. And a couple of the things that I do on
campus, one, I’m an Orange Key tour guide, so I lead tours on campus
for prospective studies. And I also work for Matriculate, the Princeton
Chapter of Matriculate, which is an opportunity to do virtual advising for high school
studies working on college applications.>>Hello, my name is Marcella. I’m a junior. I’m in the chemistry department. I’m from Buffalo, New York. And some of the things that I do on
campus are I have two work study jobs. I also used to play on the
Club Ultimate Frisbee team. And next semester, I’m going to be, and
as Josiah mentioned, a SIFP Head Fellow to help advise and mentor low income students. And I used to live in Forbes Residential
College, but now I’m an upperclassman, so I live in upperclassmen housing.>>Hi, everyone. My name is Daniel. I’m in the Class of 2020. I’m a computer science major
in the Engineering School. I lived in Houston, Texas the nine
years leading up to Princeton, but I lived in Columbia before that. I used to live in [inaudible] College, but now as an upperclassman, I
live in upperclassmen housing. Some of the things I do on campus
are I’m the president of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
Chapter, which involves many things. Relationships between employers
and students on campus. And I’m the president of [inaudible] clubs, which are Princeton’s version
of Greek life on campus.>>Great. So, thank you so much for giving that
introduction, those wonderful introductions. We’re really sort of excited
to jump right into it. So, we’d love to talk a little
bit about academics at Princeton. So, if you could just share your
experiences, whether that’s in lectures or what we call precepts, and maybe
give an idea of what a precept is. That would be really helpful. Are there any professors
that really stuck out to you? Things along those lines I think is
a good sort of starting point here.>>Yeah, so I could speak a
little bit to this one, I think. For one class that I took actually
last year during my freshman spring, I took a course about linguistics, which
was one that I had never really had any kind of introduction to before, and I
mostly took it because I wanted to fulfill a requirement, a
general education requirement. We call them distribution requirements. So, that’s what led me to that course. I had no prior knowledge of it. And what I was actually able
to do was a big lecture. It was, you know, at least 150, 200 students. But what I was actually able to do was have
one on one discussions with my professor because my professor was also my preceptor. So, the precept program is what Princeton
does to help with those bigger lectures, so we have lectures with lots of students
are kind of balanced out by a weekly precept. So, you would have two lectures a week,
and then you would also have a precept, which is just a smaller group of students
going back over the same material. And I got lucky because often
those same professors who teach the course will
at least teach one precept. So, I was in the linguistic precept with a linguistics professor
who does linguistics research. And she spent that time to
really teach me the basics. And I had a great time with my
small precept learning about it. So, I think that was one of the first times
that I felt super, super like accessible. Like, I thought my professor was really
accessible, and I was able to get really into that subject when I didn’t
really think that I could.>>Another thing that I would add about the
professors is you just don’t realize the quality of the professors that we have at Princeton. So, you really go to other schools
and you start talking to people. One of the experiences I’ve had is
I was learning in computer science, it was an introductory course
taught by Kevin Wayne. And I was talking to some
friends from other schools, and they were like, oh, wait,
you know Kevin Wayne. And I was like, yeah, why? And they were like, well,
he does all the textbooks for computer science courses
across the United States. So, I just felt like, oh, yeah, I see
him like every Monday and Wednesday. He’s not like daily in my life, but they’re
actually just really high quality professors.>>Great. So, can, why don’t we talk about
the accessibility that you guys have in terms of getting a hold of the office hours or, you
know, other ways that you are able to interact with your professors in a
really kind of like quality way.>>So, one unique thing that Princeton offers, especially for freshmen students,
are freshmen seminars. So, it’s kind of like a smaller class size. It’s about 12 students. And it’s open only to freshmen. And they offer it in the fall and the spring. And it’s on a variety of topics. So, I took one in bioethics with actually the
previous president of Princeton, Harold Shapiro. And so obviously that’s kind of
intimidating, but it was really cool because you get to know them one on one kind of. And it’s a really small class size, so
then you, for all your papers and stuff, you kind of meet with them in their
office and they go through all of your arguments and everything. And you also get to know them, like what they, like what they did before
Princeton as president and stuff. So, it was really cool to hear what kind
of life they had and get to know them on a personal level as well
beyond the classroom.>>Great. Great. So, I think this has all been really helpful in
sort of getting an idea of what that transition to Princeton can be like, and in terms of
academics, and sort of getting some insight. For those of you who are, let’s say,
more advanced in their Princeton career, I’d love to hear about maybe
what your junior projects are. And if you could give us some idea of what
a junior project is slash a senior thesis, that would be really helpful
I think for students to kind of get a gist of what that’s like.>>So, I guess, I’m a junior, as I
mentioned, in the chemistry department. So, all juniors are basically, it depends
on your department, but in many departments, they require that you do a junior paper. So, it’s kind of an introduction to
what is called the senior thesis. And all Princeton students, except
for I think some BSE departments, which is engineering school, are
required to do a senior thesis, which is like your own research project. And juniors are kind of introduced
to that with the junior paper. So, for chemistry, it’s kind
of more research focused. We actually get assigned a paper
from a lab that we are thinking about joining for our senior thesis research. So, I had to turn that in a couple of weeks ago. And I read one of the papers from a lab that
I am interested in joining next semester, and then you write a small
critique on that paper. And it kind of varies on the department. But it’s basically to introduce you to the idea of like scientific thinking
and independent work.>>And just to add a bit about the senior
thesis on engineering, pretty much every major at Princeton requires a student
does some form of a thesis. I’m in computer science, and it
is the only major at Princeton in the engineering school that
will not complete a thesis. But what we will do is we will complete some
form of [inaudible], which means you work with a professor and they define kind of
loosely what your project is going to be, or you take an award seminar offered
by the Department of Computer Science, which is taught by a professor
with a small group of students in which you will have your own project,
you will have your own hours to work on it, and at the end, you’ll present it to the panel.>>Great. And I know that Kaitlyn
and Josiah are both much more of our humanities interested students. And Josiah, we were talking earlier, and you said that you were really
interested in your writing seminar. Can you talk a little bit about kind of
what that was and sort of your experience, as far as underclassman in
these departments at Princeton?>>Yeah, so, the writing seminar,
basically every freshman is going to go through one either in the fall or the spring. And basically what it does is it teaches you
the skills of argument that are necessary for upper classes that you
might take, as well as later on, it will be useful for the junior paper or
the junior project and your senior thesis. So, essentially, I was very interested in choosing a writing seminar
that spoke to my interests. And luckily, I was able to get into
one that spoke to my interests. So, mine is called American Descent. And it’s kind of been my own method of
performing quality research as a freshmen. So, it’s kind of also informed my major choices
in the future since we can’t [inaudible]. And so our sophomore or spring. So, I’ve been able to do a lot of sociological
research about, you know, race or ethnicity and all of these different things
that I’ve kind of had an interest in looking at since I was in high school. But now I’ve got the access
too like the library. I checked out I think about 11
books for my research paper. And, yeah, it felt like I was doing
something genuinely contributing to a [inaudible] conversation.>>I also think I can speak
to that a little bit as well. So, kind of give to a little bit of
specifics, I think, so I took a writing seminar as well freshman year, just like many of you. That’s the one course that every Princeton
student takes, regardless of major or any other affiliation on campus. That’s kind of the great equalizer. And it was really comforting to me
knowing that coming into the university, I would have a course with everyone no matter
what kind of high school they came from, all working together in getting on that level
playing field, so that made me feel pretty good, prepared, I think, to tackle
the kind of daunting JP, or junior paper, senior thesis kind of thing. So, for me, my writing seminar was called
The Big Apple, so it was about New York City. So, in exploring New York City, that was kind
of what all of our papers were based around. And for your final paper,
you kind of pick a topic. So, what my paper was about was about
food experience in New York City, specifically this one restaurant
called Black Tap. And it’s these giant viral milkshakes that
I think a lot of people have seen online. So, I actually studied those using like a
sociological review of yelp.com and looking at how the comments changed about
from the burgers and the tastes before to after it went viral about
like how it changed to like look and presentation and store convenience. So, it’s kind of a little bit of specifics about
a freshman informed like glimpse into research.>>Great. So, we just received
one of our first questions. And I think this is maybe a
little close to home right now. But the question is, what is
reading period slash dean’s date? And did you all get the free beanies?>>Okay, so, yes. So, this is, yeah, so, this is my
first reading period slash dean’s date.>>Yay!>>And I am very grateful that
dean’s date is finally completed. So, basically what reading period is,
it’s an opportunity for you to, well, like catch up on readings or review
materials before we have finals, because our finals come after the winter break. So, it’s been great for me to be able to go
back and like look at the notes that I’ve taken, kind of target specific areas that I need during
reading period, as well as I’ve been able to, you know, do my assignments
I have to do for dean’s date. Because dean’s date is like the final
deadline for all the written work that you might have in any classes. So, for my writing seminar, I had a dean’s
date assignment that was due yesterday at 5:00. So, and that’s another time where you might, you kind of know that everyone
is stressing out together. You’re all in it together. So, it’s kind of a cool experience in that way.>>And just in terms of, as you mentioned,
though, there might be some stress around dean’s date, though, and hopefully,
through, there are some other supports that you can utilize, whether
they be formal or informal, to kind of help you have a
less stressful dean’s date.>>Yeah, yeah. So, one of the things that we have
are like the McGraw Tutoring sessions. And McGraw is kind of just a place that you
can get academic support if you need it. Additionally, there’s the Writing Center. This is especially helpful for
freshmen who are in writing seminars. They will provide you independent
support with whatever you’re writing. And they can help you like at
any point throughout the process. So, there’s a lot of different ways to
alleviate the stresses that might come around an intense day like dean’s date.>>Do upperclassmen have some
advice as well for dean’s date?>>Yeah, so, as Josiah mentioned, there’s
dean’s date, it’s kind of like a big day for Princeton students, but there’s so much
that’s going on also outside of classes. Like, you’re not actually taking
any classes during reading period, so you have all of the time to kind of manage
yourself, which is hard to get used to at first, but they also have so many review
sessions for all of your classes. There’s study breaks pretty much
every night listing through the like RCAs in your residential colleges. Basically, they’ll try and make sure
that you’re fed, whether you’re staying up and writing papers or whatever. But, yeah, it’s a time where you
get to prepare for your papers. And, yeah.>>Great. So, now that we’ve sort
of answered that first question, we have received another question. So, the question is, how do
certificate programs affect majors? And maybe for Daniel, on top of the additional
courses, what is it, is it possible to, you know, get an engineering, or sorry, to get an additional certificate
essentially is the question.>>Yeah. So, certificates at Princeton are
kind of like [inaudible] at other schools, but they’re different in that for certificates,
you not only have to take the courses, but you also have to do some sort of independent
work, sort of like Capstone the project and basically make sure you earn certificate,
that you’ve gone beyond just taking the courses. And it’s definitely possible. I’ve chosen not to do it
myself, but many of my friends at engineering have chosen engineering
specific certificates, like I know there’s some in material science and other things like that. I know other friends who are also
engineering, but choosing certificates in Latin American studies or
specific language certificates. And it’s definitely doable. You just have to like work with your advisors
on how to structure your academic curriculum, such that you can take the courses that
you need, and also not overwhelm yourself.>>Great. We also have another question. And it’s around club sports. It’s kind of like, so, what exactly is
the time commitment for club sports? I think you can also talk about time commitments for any other non academic
commitments that we have at Princeton. Because, you know, we have
other ways other than academics. Our students certainly are involved outside
of the classroom in a variety of ways as well. I know that Josiah is on the archery squad. So, can you talk a little bit about that?>>Yes, so, I, in my experience, the club
archery, it’s a very chill environment. Like, they don’t expect you necessarily
to have a ton of archery experience. Of course, there are like tryouts. And then they kind of go
through a self sustaining process of choosing each person as they join the team. And with regards to the time commitment,
it’s not necessarily that much. It’s basically whatever you want to put into it. For me, I can. So, for example, there are
practices that we have every week. And it’s kind of catered to whatever
time constraints you might have. And then we also have trips to the archery
range that’s relatively close to campus where you might carpool or UberPool
with other people to the archery range. And then we also have competitions
throughout the year. But the competitions are
typically on like a weekend. It’s probably a quiet weekend. I think we have like six
different competitions this year. We already competed in one. It was the Ivy League tournament. And like I didn’t necessarily
perform that well in the tournament. But it was still a great experience because
even as, even though it’s a club sport, we still are like representing Princeton. I guess like the other Ivy Leagues. So, it’s definitely a great sense of community
as well, being part of the club archery team.>>I think I could also speak a little
bit, just like sense of community, with extracurricular commitments, because I
think, especially for me, before actually coming to college, I was nervous about balancing
homework, class work with the things that I just wanted to be
involved with on campus. And I think, at least for me, I found that
just choosing to be involved in things where I can find that kind of community, like
you said, with archery, just trying to put that sense of community and friendship along with the commitments you choose
to join is really important. So then it fits more into your schedule because
you’re also taking a break from working on class to join the people that you like
to do something you like together. So, I think it fits more into your schedule that
way, and it’s a little bit easier to balance when you like what you’re committing to. And I’ve also found that for me, the
different clubs and organizations and activities I’ve joined, it’s really
nice because everyone understands that here, everyone’s time is valuable, I think, generally. And so, you know, I’ve been very
upfront beginning like, you know, this is how many hours a week we
would expect for you to do this. Does that seem okay with you? Like, everyone knows how busy everyone is, so we have a way of fitting
it into each other, I think.>>Great. So, we just received another question. And I think this is good to kind of talk
about in regards to balancing everything. So, the question is, is it possible to do
research, whether that’s science in general, or another area with professors
your freshmen year. Is the process to apply for these
research opportunities competitive? Could you maybe walk us through
those kind of, that kind of process?>>Yeah, so I can speak to that a little bit. Actually, the summer after my freshman
year, I did this program called ReMatch. And it’s specifically for
underclassmen interested in research. So, I joined a chemistry lab. And at the time, I didn’t know that
I wanted to be a chemistry major. And then you also get matched
with a grad student mentor, and you write a proposal together. And this happens during the school
year, during your freshman year. Or you could also do it after
your sophomore year. And you kind of join them on the research. And then it’s also, you kind
of take it on your own. So, they teach you everything in the lab. And then you spend all summer with them. But it’s also possible to
join the lab during the year. And I have some friends who do that. You have to just manage your time with it. And there’s a lots who will join a lab
as underclassmen and stay in that lab through senior thesis so that you can
kind of have a more meaningful project and a more meaningful connection with the lab. You basically just, you know,
you’ll go to class in the morning and then you’ll go in working the lab at night. Yeah, so it’s definitely possible to manage
both of those things, both in academics, like humanities, those kinds
of things, and also in science, in labs [inaudible] labs
and those kinds of things.>>Great. So, we have another question. So, please, if you have any questions,
please use the Q&A box at the bottom. Type those in. And we’ll be able to get those answered
by our current students or by our staff. We do have another question. It’s about preparation. So, and I know Josiah, you are
a member of our SIFP Program. So, if you can kind of talk about kind of
ways that you thought you were prepared for the academic rigor and the expectations
coming from your high school and moving into your first year at Princeton. And I know that all of you have
many experiences around that. But let me start with Josiah.>>Okay, so, one of the things that I
did, and it’s kind of like in connection to the SIFP Program, is called FSI. It’s the Freshman Scholars Institute. I did the online version. It’s called like FSI 2 U. But, in essence,
what they do is they kind of put you, if you’re on campus, then you’ll have two
classes or two full classes that you will, you know, go through the motions of
an entire, of a Princeton education. For me, it was different in that I wasn’t on
campus, but I was still getting the information from like the writing class everyone goes to. So, at the beginning, my writing was not
necessarily up to par, I don’t think, with, you know, the rigor, or what
Princeton wants out of me. But, essentially what I was able to do
through the FSI 2 U program was that I had like a preceptor who I worked
with over the summer. We wrote like three different papers. And we kind of, it was kind of a lot of what we
would go through later on in writing seminar. So, it was kind of a unique way to get
me ready for writing seminar as well, just like the language that would be
used, as well as the different strategies when it comes to writing academic papers. Because that is a, it’s a hard task to kind
of, you know, bring together a bunch of sources and make an argument that’s your own. And FSI was able to help me with that. And then continuing on to my freshman
year, I’ve been a SIFP Fellow. And through that, I’ve had a mentor who’s
an upperclassman who has kind of gone through the different academic
challenges that I’ve encountered now, as well as the challenges outside of the
classroom with regards to like internships or just, you know, other, extra,
managing your time, extracurriculars. So, there’s definitely a lot for me as like
a low income student especially to get used to what life is like here at Princeton, because
it can be very fast paced and challenging.>>Yeah, and I think as a sophomore,
I can speak to kind of just like the logical extension of
that, just into another year. I’ve had very similar experiences
with the SIFP Program as well. But I think I want to talk a little bit about
some of the opportunities and advising available in the residential college programs. So, no matter where you come
in at the university, whichever residential college you
get randomly sorted into, though, we have very strong affiliations
with our residential college. It was random and very arbitrary. But I say all that to say Forbes is the best. But [inaudible] has actually a lot
of different resources available. And I think for me coming in during my
first year, that was kind of where I kind of moved toward getting that help. So, one person would be your director of
studies who is someone who works in your office. So, they’re very close to you as well. They’re very easily accessible. You don’t have to walk very far. There’s one in every residential college. And they get to know you really well
because they’re only dealing with, you know, one sixth of your class. So, they kind of get a little bit more in
touch with the people that surround them. And they really come through, especially
during times like now, during reading period and themes day, that is the
director of studies’ time to shine. They’ll send you those helpful emails that
remind you of dates, that you can come see them in different office hours and things like that. And I’ve had really meaningful conversations
with my director of studies, just about, you know, logical ways to get through
a class experience, like, you know, I need help managing readings
and things like that. And so things that you would think
students have to figure out on their own, I’ve actually found those
resources to be really helpful. It’s just allowing me the opportunity to
get more comfortable with what [inaudible].>>Great.>>Can I add to the answer to that? Because like not to keep
it over here or anything, but like the residential college is actually
a place of like a lot of helpful resources. For example, we have our RCA, which
is our residential college advisor. I’ve been able to turn to my RCA for anything
with regards to classes, but also if I’m having like a problem with my social life,
she’s there to give me advice. She’s a senior. So, she’s been going, or she’s been,
being formed by the Princeton experience. In addition, I have like a peer academic
advisor who typically is able to give me advice on which classes might be like, you know, they
have like easier classes here at Princeton, which is what students considerably hard. But they typically are able to give advice as
to which classes might go best if you’re doing like a fifth class, which you have
to do once during your freshman and sophomore year from my experience. At least once. I don’t know. I’m still trying to figure it out myself. But, yeah, so, the RCA relationship with
sees, which is like the advisees, it is, has been very important to me in
that I am able to have like a built in mentor who lives down the hall from me. And that’s really cool.>>That’s amazing to hear,
and we’re really glad to hear that you’re continually supported
here at Princeton. For Daniel and Marcella, we received a question that I think you both would
be able to answer very well. Did everyone sort of know or have a general idea of what they wanted to major
in or concentrate in? And if not, how did you figure
out how to go about, you know, what the right concentration was for you? Has anyone changed majors? And if so, what’s that like?>>So, I’m kind of an exception, I think,
because I have known what I wanted to major in since sophomore year of high school. So, it was very easy for me to know that
I wanted to major in computer science. But throughout the whole process,
it was very easy to know, okay, this is what this track looks like,
this is what other tracks look like, and the process to change within the
engineering school was not very difficult. And even if you want to switch out of the engineering school [inaudible]
it just requires like an extra [inaudible].>>Yeah, so, I definitely switched
my major like multiple times. And it’s totally fine to do that. You don’t have to declare your concentration
until the end of your sophomore year. The exception is for engineering students. If you want to be in the engineering
school, you do have to declare by the end of your freshman year. So, I actually came in as a
chemical and biological engineer. And so I took engineering courses my freshman
year, and then I ended up switching out, and I went to more bio, like molecular biology. And then after taking a couple
more chemistry classes, I ended up switching my sophomore
year into chemistry. But I know like those are very similar science
focused, but it’s also very common to switch from like not being in the engineering school. So, if you come in and you want to
do something, and then you realize that you’re actually interested in
engineering, you can just meet with them, fill out some forms, and go
into the engineering school. That’s a little more difficult with, they
have a lot more requirements in terms of courses for taking higher level courses. You have to take some before that. But, in general, it’s very common to switch. And people switch all the time,
switching out of the engineering school, or switching from communities to science,
it’s very common for freshmen and sophomores.>>Thank you guys. So, just, we’re going to do a
little bit of a balancing act here. So, we have talked about
academics here at Princeton. But how do you all balance your academics with,
you know, having healthy balanced social life, but also kind of how do you do self care,
especially around times like dean’s dates, you know, and coming up for reading period
and finals, and also, are there any spaces, you know, that you find that you really
go to to, you know, defines that space, whether that be in your dorm or in eating club
or other spaces available on campus as well?>>Yeah, so I think I can
speak to this quite a bit. My freshman year, I came with the idea
that I’m here because of academics, and that’s what I have to focus on, and
I didn’t really get involved on campus. And it just isn’t good for you because
it just places all your happiness weight on your brains, which isn’t a good thing to do. It’s good to try new things, try like, and also
be involved on campus, being in an eating club, and that was a lot better because I get
to, I’m the president of an eating club, so I get to administer the eating club, and I
get to show people like what the club is about. I get to throw events for people that are happy, and that really like does contribute
to just overall like well being. With regards to being busy,
that’s definitely something that you learn by doing here at Princeton. You very much have to schedule a lot of things. I had to schedule lunches before just
because of how busy the calendar is. But I think that you definitely grow into it. And as far as the eating club
goes, I think for most people, it’s just a space where they can meet
with their friends and they don’t really, like they can study there, but they
also, we have like a game room, and we have like just the dining room where
people can just sit and talk and just forget about the fact that Princeton
is an academic institution, but also like focus on their
social side a bit more.>>I think that’s a really
great thing to bring up. If you could talk a little bit about
what I think is a really important topic, like meals here and food, food blends. What, like, can you give us some
background on the eating clubs, and maybe like what the options are
in terms of for underclassmen in terms of dining halls and things like that?>>Yeah, so, as an underclassman, I had friends
at other institutions, and being from Texas, you really are far from anyone you
know when you come to Princeton. So, I brought them to Princeton
all the time to our dining halls. We have six residence national colleges
I think with a few dining halls. And all of my friends say, oh, my gosh,
Princeton food is so much better than X school. And really the dining halls are
much better than other schools. But by your second year, you start
kind of getting tired of dining halls, so Princeton expands your options. You, after your second year, you no
longer have to be on a meal plan. You can join an eating club. And I’ll talk about that a bit later. You can join our club, which
is a meeting of students where each member has to
cook at least once a night. Or you can go into planning, which means
you’re held accountable for your own meals. As far as the eating club
goes, there are 11 of them. And it’s our version of Greek life,
but it’s also a dining option. So, each eating club has its own
culture, and we also have our own food. And one of the great things about it, I think,
is that we’re very flexible with student needs. Because we are smaller, we are also able
to switch our menus whenever we want. And the student administration, you just have
to ask one of the officers, like, hey, I want, I had an officer come up to me and say, oh, I want white pizza sauce, and
make your own pizza Fridays. I was like, okay, I talked to
[inaudible] very next Friday. So, I mean, the dining halls
are a bit slower on [inaudible].>>So, again, as a follow up, what’s that sense
of community you feel within the eating clubs, or within, you know, just the
Princeton community in general. If you guys can kind of just
speak a little bit towards that, especially given your sort
of varying class years.>>I guess with the eating club, I would say that since we have a busy social
calendar, we have study breaks every week. We also throw parties. We have, we know, we have a spreadsheet
where we know who’s taking what classes, and we have our [inaudible] classes. You definitely get very close with the people. And in a place that can be so busy as Princeton,
the one thing we have to do is eat, right? So, the fact that we have our dining hall,
and if that dining hall is filled with people that are in your club, you really like
get close with them because at a time that you’re eating, you’re also talking to them. And it means that we are like
part, like I think what’s centered as social life here at Princeton.>>I think I could speak a little bit
to kind of the sophomore experience, and also the freshman experience
before that as well. There are a lot of different opportunities
to pick different eating options after sophomore year, but I think by
the time you get to your sophomore year, you’re kind of very settled into the community. And that was something, at least in bringing
up the different ways that his friends from universities outside of Princeton respond
to Princeton, I think something that I do forget about a lot is just how residential
the community at Princeton is. I think last time I checked, it was
like 96% of Princeton students stay on the campus all four years, which means that seniors too are still very
much contributing to campus life. I can also say many of the upperclassmen
dorms are closer than my residence of college Forbes to direct to the campus. So, that just means that you are
really here for your four years. And a lot of students are making the most of it. So, if that means meeting up with
friends or meeting new people in the dining hall, they’ll do it. So, you see a lot of people kind of
having that community over eating. And then you also have people eating
alone and getting things done. So, there’s a lot of different ways to kind
of go about making the community your own. But the good thing is that everyone is in it. Great. So, I think at this point,
it would be good to sort of think about we’ve received a question about what the
process of finding a work study job is like. And are there places that offer,
you know, more study opportunities that work with your class schedules.>>Yeah. So, I’ve been in work
study jobs since freshman year. It’s kind of part of my financial aid. So, I joined, I work in the
undergraduate chemistry lab window. So, when they administer general
chemistry classes, they have labs to them. And then they have like, if they
need any equipment or anything, I sit at the window and I give that out to them. So, if you haven’t required, then
you can qualify for work study jobs. And there’s a student employment website that
kind of has a list of all on campus jobs, and then they also have off
campus jobs that are nearby. And they range, like a wide
range of different things. If you want to work in a library where
you just sit at a desk and then you just, if people come up to you and have questions,
you can usually do homework during those jobs. So, those are in high demand. And then there’s also jobs like tutoring. If you want to tutor Princeton
high school students, or if you want to tutor other
Princeton students, undergrads, you can do any range of those kinds of things. Also, SAT tutoring is also very common. And then there’s also like more
administrative type of things where you’re kind of an assistant
for some people. And then you can also work in the dining hall. So, they have student workers in the dining
halls that help bring out food, clean up, and all of those different jobs
have different levels of commitment. So, I like the job that I have
because I basically just sit there and I can do homework during it, and I’ve
had it for the past two and a half years. And then this year, I got another job
with a student agency called Safeguard, and they it’s more like you help run
events and stuff because there’s all kinds of events happening at Princeton all the time,
so they have students kind of stand at the door and make sure that it’s Princeton
students and stuff. So, yeah, it’s been manageable. You have to work around your schedule, though.>>If I may add, Princeton is very good
about work study because they have jobs that you can only apply to
if you’re a work study. They can only hire you if you’re work study. So, I think it makes it very easy
for people who are in work study. There is also like a wide array of other jobs. I am a director of a Princeton
student agency, Safeguard agency. And what I do is I manage
billing and paying our employees. And one of the things it
allows me to do is it allows me to get higher pay based on
how much the agency makes. So, it’s kind of like I’m getting to run my
own little business within the institution, which is also something very unique on campus.>>I have something to add a
little bit as well, if that’s okay.>>Oh, yeah, of course.>>So, I started the job
early freshman year as well. I’m also on work study. And the job that I actually started was through
Title Call, which is a program that runs through the Princeton Office of Annual
Giving, which is connected to the alumni. And it’s soliciting gifts, but it’s also
just keeping in contact with alumni. And so I was actually started freshman year
calling alumni on the phone, e mailing them, sending different mailings to them,
and just having this great contact. And the great part about that
job is it is actually at night. And so I was able to, you know, go to class
during the day, and a lot of those shifts are like 7:00 p.m.ish, so it was really,
really easy to work into my schedule. And it was also a great kind of relevant job to
get really cool skills and different experiences out of it that wasn’t just, you know, spending
time somewhere, but actually having some kind of valuable experience to learn from. And I still do that now.>>Great. So, kind of going on with
the experiences that you all are having with your work study, what about in
terms of working with the career center or other advising for your post Princeton plan? I know that some of you are
closer to that than others. But also, have you had opportunities to engage
in either externships during the academic year, or perhaps over the summer, you know, and
also what has that advising looked like? Is it through your academic advisor? Or are there other layers of advisement
that are helping you for your next steps?>>So, for careers, I am the president of the
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers. And what I do is I get e
mails from employers who want to hire Hispanic engineers here at Princeton. And one of the things that amazed me my first
year is that I joined this organization, which at the time was a lot
smaller, and the organization, the national organization has a conference each
year in a different city, and Princeton paid for me as a freshman who had not really
completely declared the engineering department to fly to Seattle. They paid for my flight, my hotel, to go to
this conference and get to talk to companies. And my first year, I just talked
to a few computer science companies that I told that I was a freshman. And I ended up getting an
internship at Facebook. And I continued with that
internship, and I got a return offer and I interned at Facebook last summer. So, there’s definitely opportunities, especially
if you’re within the engineering field. That’s my [inaudible] that you can intern at
places, and Princeton holds its own career fair where they invite a bunch of companies. They have an engineering specific
career fair where they invite companies to look specifically for engineering students. So, there’s definitely opportunities there.>>And just to add on, so, I want
to go to medical school after. I’m pre med, so, they actually have an entire
office for health professions advising anywhere from medical school to dental
school, pharmacy, like everything. And they have people who work there
that you can set up meetings with. And they encourage you to meet
with them from your freshman year. So, I know like one of the advisors pretty well, and I meet with her pretty much every semester
before course enrollment to kind of go over my schedule and see if I’m on track. And then they also have a great alumni network,
so they can connect you with previous students who have done things, and they can connect
you with like different organizations. And they were the ones that actually
encouraged me to apply to an abroad program. So, last summer, I we find
abroad to India and did some kind of pre health shadowing a little bit. So, that’s a great office for
any type of pre health advising.>>Yeah, and to a little bit more generic
advising, just for the student population at large, there’s the Office
of International Programs for more opportunities like
that one that’s abroad. And so within that office, there’s opportunities
to study abroad during the academic year. But there’s also a lot of different Princeton
programs that give the opportunity to go abroad in different ways during the summer. So, some of those are classes, but
some of them are actually internships. So, I actually did that. I participated in the International
Internship Program through that office. And I actually had an internship
for eight weeks in Galway, Ireland. Very random. [ Inaudible ] Working for Baboro International
Arts Festival for Children, which is a non profit children’s
festival in Glaway, Ireland, where I spent two months working for
their office in communications, you know, learning how to work at a small non
profit office, but also getting all of those different international
opportunities as well. So, not every international
opportunity has to be a class. There’s also these internships. So, there’s different ways
to participate in that. And then, of course, there’s some for health
professions, but also other ones as well. And there are many, many different regions. That can also be research. I’ve known people to do that. Or it can be something generally
as random as a tour guide.>>Great. So, we had a question about affinity
spaces and also kind of affinity groups that are available to our students on campus.>>Yeah, so I know about, there’s
Princeton Latinos y Amigos, which is the panned Latino
organization on campus. And they, at the beginning of every year,
they host what is Latinx Heritage Month, which is a month just about
Latino history, Latino culture. And I know they have Whitman college to
operate in having just a Latino food night. They have also like all sort
of events throughout the month. But also throughout the year, they have
several study breaks, several events, especially, and they also narrow them down. Like somewhere they have a
group called [inaudible]. That’s just for Latino women who all
want to meet together in a space to talk about what it means to be a Latino
woman, or a Latino woman at Princeton. And every semester, they also have a
gala, and they invite a special speaker. We’ve had Jorge Ramos, which is the
most famous Hispanic news anchor in the United States come talk to us. We’ve had Diane Guerrero, which is an
actress from Orange is the New Black. So, we definitely have great speakers on campus. And it’s just a great experience to also like
get to meet other Latino students at Princeton.>>So, one of the cool spaces that we have
on campus is the Carl A. Fields Center. And it’s kind of like a place where it sponsors
a lot of like the affinity group activities, as well as, you can just study there, if
you want to go there with your friends. But one of the things that I’ve
been doing as a freshman is I’m like an events consultant
for the Black Student Union. So, I kind of give them like ideas for
different events that they can put on. I also help set up events. And the Black Student Union has like, it’s kind of like starting a new event
every year now where we have a gala. We just had ours a couple of weeks ago. We had like pictures and a speaker, or
like a person speaker, we have music, we have it was a great way to, you know, foster community of most of
the black students on campus. We all got dressed up and
we went to [inaudible]. It was a great time. But a lot of the things that can happen
with like activities like that is that you can find friends who
have similar experiences too, and you can talk about those experiences,
and they can end up being, you know, ways to, you know, network and build another sense of
community with a different group of people who you might find in an
exceptional college for me. So, that’s been very valuable.>>Great, great. Thank you so much for, you know,
sharing a bit about those empty spaces and those groups that you’re a part of. One group I think is really important
to talk about, and I’d love if just one of you could talk about it before we get
to our sort of final question, is that, what’s the QuestBridge sort of
network and chapter on campus like? And if students are interested in
joining, how can they go about joining it?>>Yeah, so, I’m actually on the executive
board this year, so I can speak a bit to this. So, in the past, the Princeton
QuestBridge network takes different forms of Quest Scholars Network for Princeton. But this year, what it’s like is a liaison
or president applies to QuestBridge directly to become that kind of icon
for the year at Princeton. And then you can send applications
in to become part of the executive board towards the
beginning of the year with them. So, this year, I’m a public speaker, because
I was really excited about getting to write about the new events we were having. And then if you don’t want to
get involved in that kind of way, all the different events you’re able to join. And we do a lot of publicity, a lot of
Facebook, Instagram, Twitter kind of things. We email a lot. A lot. And we have all of
these different events. And so that’s kind of a way to kind of
join the QuestBridge community in that way. So, we have different study breaks. We have the National Quest Day that all the
chapters in the country take part of it. And so we have one of those. We have a giant cake, and have a great
time, balloons and things like that. So, that’s kind of the different ways
that you can get involved with that. But always everyone on the
executive board, and honestly anyone in QuestBridge community has these different
ways to contact each other to just make sure that the community is staying in touch, but
also that we’re kind of planning for the future to make the Princeton chapter even better.>>That’s so awesome to hear. As a former Quest scholar, I’m definitely
excited to hear that you guys are, you know, continuing the efforts. So, just to sort of wrap up, we’d
love to hear sort of your perspective and your reflection on your
Princeton experience. So, if you could, you know, give us each
shortly, you know, a piece of advice, sort of looking back, what
would that piece of advice be?>>I mean, okay, I guess I’ll go. I have the least amount of
time here of the entire group. But I think that one of the things
that I’ve learned about being here is that you definitely don’t have to do everything. There’s a lot of things that
you can do on campus. And one of the things that you shouldn’t
do on campus is spread yourself too thin. I’ve seen a lot of my friends get really burnt
out about having so many different things to do. But I think that if you find what you
really enjoy doing, and just get really good at doing thing, then you’re going to be
much better off than trying to, you know, manage so many different
things, because your time and your social life will
both suffer as a result.>>I would say I think looking back on a lot of
my freshman year, I was plagued by insecurity, much like many people beyond freshman year are. I think, especially moving into the university, I was terrified that I wasn’t prepared
to take on Princeton academics. I truly thought that I was going to be the
least prepared of anyone in my classes. I thought, I am going to be the one
person in the lecture who can’t keep up. And I think the biggest piece of advice I
would give myself is you deserve to be here. The admissions counselors who
admitted you truly believe and want you to be part of this community. And the quicker that you accept that and move
forward, the better off you’re going to be. So, I would definitely say just not worry less,
but I saw this quote on Twitter, worry smaller, because that shouldn’t be a worry
as you move forward, I think. And I think it’s the thing that
everyone is going to have to face. But please face it less time than I did.>>Yeah, so, kind of going off of a similar
thing, after being here for two years, I would definitely emphasize that you
shouldn’t be afraid to ask for help. There’s so many resources here. And I’m sure wherever you go,
there’s opportunities to get help. And part of the reason that I chose Princeton is
because it’s also a place where you can explore. So, I’m a chemistry major. But also, now I just decided to get a
Latin American studies certificate actually like last month. So, you can, you know, like change
your mind about a lot of things. And it’s difficult to kind of
like figure out your track. So, along the way, I’ve had a lot of mentors. And I would say that those people have been the
most helpful for me, whether it’s my friends or professors or just different people who
run different extracurricular activities. So, don’t be afraid to ask for
help in every step of the way.>>And what I would say is I think both years
ago when I was watching a similar play out, I was very scared that I am from
Columbia, and I live in Texas, so New Jersey didn’t sound
like the warmest place to me. And also, I was close with my family. And, you know, having to leave them behind, two point eight thousand
miles, seems like a big deal. And I would definitely say to myself like not
to be afraid to go far and don’t be afraid because there’s like the
opportunities like this one. And I would also say like when I was
looking around, I pretty much focus on like U.S. rates and national rankings. And I knew I wanted to be a
computer science major, so, MIT is number one, but Princeton
is number eight. I want to go to number eight
if I get into number one. And after visiting the schools, you really
learn that Princeton will prioritize you as an undergraduate and as a
freshman over anybody else on campus, over the professors, over
the other upperclassmen. You are the most important person to them. They give us free gear, they give us
free shirts, free hats all the time. I have way too much Princeton gear. Princeton loves you more than anyone will.>>Great, great. Thank you so much. It’s so great to hear that you all have
had such a welcomed experience here. And we’re so thankful that
you’re able to share it with some of our QuestBridge students as well. So, this is basically going to be
the end of the panel at this point. And, again, I just want to
thank everyone in attendance. We’ve really appreciated it. And I do want to say that we’re so sorry we
weren’t able to get to all of your questions. But thankfully, our wonderful
panelists have, you know, given us the okay to share some
of their contact information. So, we’re going to actually just share
the screen right now with you guys. So, this screen includes
our contact information. So, the general admissions contact information, as well as the contact information
for each of our panelists. So, if you feel the need or want to
learn a little bit more about what one of our panelists have been doing or are going to
do, they are more than happy to chat with you. And, again, if you have any questions,
you know that you want to direct to us on the admission team, we’re more
than happy to help you out as well. Again, thank you so much. And we really appreciate you coming.>>Bye, now!>>Bye bye!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *