Olympic Champion Emily Seebohm at age 14 | Before They Were Superstars

Olympic Champion Emily Seebohm at age 14 | Before They Were Superstars


She’s a pleasure to coach
and it’s exciting time. I think time will tell. I reckon I could be
the next big wave in the pool and I hope to do that
some time. She’s a competitor.
She just loves to race. Nothing seems to faze her. Back in 2007, Emily Seebohm
was already being hailed as a future star of the
Australian swimming world and someone who would go on to win many medals
at the Olympics. It’s pretty cool to have
people talking about you. But it’s a good thing that they’re saying good things
about you and not bad things. And you know, I reckon I could be the next
big wave in the pool and I hope to do that
some time. But it doesn’t have to be
Beijing. It could be London. It could be after that.
It could be anything. A teenage Emily trained
at a club in north Brisbane. She would arrive
at the pool at 5am for her morning
training sessions with her coach,
Matt Brown. At this stage
in her career, Emily had already competed at the 2007 FINA
World Championships where she finished fourth
in the 100 metres backstroke. My coach probably told me
that I could do it, but I didn’t really… I didn’t think
I’d do that good. But I was really happy
with the times I did. It was really fun and I got
the experience and everything, so it was good. She’s a competitor.
She just loves to race. Nothing seems to faze her. We saw that first at trials
and then at the world champs where at 14
and very fresh and naive got up fastest qualifier
for the final of the 100 back and really didn’t fail at all. She came out and equalled the
PB time from the night before and just nothing tended
to faze her which was quite rare
for one so young. When she was 14, Emily used to train
twice a day, in the morning and afternoon. In each session,
she would swim for two hours, covering a distance
of four miles. Emily had been around
the pool all her life. She was introduced to the sport
by her mum, Karen. She was a baby when
I first taught her to swim. And by the time
she was three years old, she was in her first
competitive race I suppose you could put it. A five-and-under,
25 metres freestyle. And she came second. She did well. A lot of people think
she’s a backstroker but she’s actually been trained
as a medley swimmer. I think my philosophy is
to give them a broad base, get them used to doing
all four strokes, mentally it’s more stimulating and they don’t just rely
on one avenue. Obviously, her backstroke
is outstanding at the moment, but down the track, you know, she is probably
12 to 18 months away from a very good 200 swimming in medley, free
and back as well. Emily had to balance her
swimming with her schoolwork. She was in Year Nine and her success at
the 2007 World Championships was the talk of
all her school friends. Oh, they were
all like screaming and telling me how good I did and they were like saying,
“Oh, you look so good on TV”, and I was like,
“Well, that’s a good thing.” Emily’s family
were hugely proud of what she had already
achieved in the sport, but they weren’t letting
the success go to her head. We don’t really think
about it much and it’s only
when I pick up a paper and I see her name and I go, “Oh, my gosh!
Yes, that’s right.” We don’t really dwell on it
a lot at home, but we all enjoy it
when we read about her and with other siblings you can’t really talk
about it so much. You just go, “Oh, that’s
really good” and “Well done” and that’s about the end of it. Emily is the third
of four children and the only daughter
to Karen and John Seebohm. Both her parents played sport
at the highest level. Dad excelled
at Australian Rules Football and mum starred
on the netball court. But it was Emily
who was destined to become the most successful
sporting Seebohm. I mean, she’s doing the bare
minimum of work at the moment compared to her peers. I mean, it’s a long-term plan
to introduce a bit more
as she gets older. It’s very tempting to put her
in the full lane now, give her the full load,
but it’s not really needed. She’s competing well
and, I mean, if she responds well to that,
then who knows, I mean, yeah…
I don’t want to say. She’s a pleasure to coach
and it’s exciting time. I think time will tell.

11 Replies to “Olympic Champion Emily Seebohm at age 14 | Before They Were Superstars”

  1. I swam the 100-meter backstroke yesterday at my swim meet and I actually did really well I came in 4th place and had a time of 200.10
    At that moment on I started to love the backstroke! 😊🏊

  2. Omg IM A FAN OF HER AND I IM A SWIMMER TO AND I SWIM THERE TOO OMGGG I DISINT NOW YOU TRAINED THERE IM ONLY 10 OMGGGGGG

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