CASA Safety Video – Ramp checks explained for Sport pilots

CASA Safety Video – Ramp checks explained for Sport pilots


MAN: CASA is involved
in the ramp checking of all aircraft. It’s CASA’s right and responsibility
to conduct ramp checks for any aircraft
that operates within Australia and that also includes the
recreational-type aircraft as well. -G’day.
-How are you going? LEE UNGERMANN: These checks
are conducted at aerodromes or where there
are gathering of flyers pretty much anywhere in Australia
where the aircraft operate. We recently conducted surveillance
in some very remote areas where people were very surprised
to actually see us. The spirit of a ramp check
is just to gauge compliance to make sure that the person
or the pilot flying the aircraft is actually fulfilling
their regulatory obligations, carrying their maps and charts and having correct medical
and pilot certification as well as making sure that the
aircraft is either registered or has the correct
maintenance-related requirements. If we do come across
large instances of noncompliance, then that’s most definitely something that CASA has the right
and responsibility to take further, however in most instances what we’re finding from
an educational perspective is there are a number
of smaller things that pilots are just
not necessarily aware of what their responsibilities are, such as an emergency locator beacon and making sure that they are
registered every two years with AMSA and making sure that
that registration remains current, and that can be right through to
carrying the correct documentation. What we’re also trying
to encourage people to do is not only having the electronic
component that they’re using, which obviously
is very popular these days, but also making sure they consider
having a backup of paper charts. ..which is current. What you do find with sports aviation is that in certain organisations –
maybe RAAOs, for example – some pilots may only fly cross-country flights
once a year, for example, and that’s to go
to one of the large fly-ins. As a consequence,
it might have been a few years since they did their initial
cross-country training. We find that sometimes people
simply forget the rules, simply forget the process
to plan a cross-country flight and, therefore, to fly
a cross-country flight safely. So when we ramp check people we find that people have flown
long distance cross-country and we can give them pointers,
education on flying safely. Also, a copy of the brochure
that every sports pilot will get in relation to ramp checks. MAN: No worries. KEVIN SCRIMSHAW:
It’s an education process in the way that we conduct it, however, we are CASA officials that if we find somebody
has breached a serious regulation, it does not prohibit us
from taking that further through the coordinated
enforcement process. The manner in which
we conduct a ramp check is to build a rapport
with the pilots that we speak to and we’re there
to answer questions as well. So if people have questions
about their flying, about how to become compliant, then certainly we discuss it
with them and improve their knowledge so that next time they fly safer
and get to their destination.

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