Arizona Illustrated Episode 330

Arizona Illustrated Episode 330


(melodic guitar music) – [Male Narrator] This
week on Arizona Illustrated Up, Up With People. ♫ Up, up with people. – [Male Narrator] Creating
your own universe of images. – [Man] I document
things that I see in the telescope because I want
to share that with people. – [Male Narrator] A grass root approach to locally sourced foods. – [Man] How can we make
it more viable to be a farmer in southern Arizona? – [Male Narrator] And, Raising
The Limit, from the vault. (melodic guitar music) – Welcome to Arizona Illustrated. I’m Tom McNamara. Up With People, a musical dance group that
performs around the world, was founded right here in Tucson in 1965. In 1993, they relocated their headquarters to Denver, but were just
recently back in town to perform. So, we decided to catch up with them to see what’s up with Up With People. – [Male Narrator] Did
you know a group that formed in Tucson went on to perform at two Presidential Inaugurations? For two Popes, at six World Expos and four Super Bowl halftimes? They were mentioned on The
Simpsons and South Park, and had backing of some of the largest multinational corporations in the world. And if you’re under 35, you’ve
probably never heard of them. – Today we may be the most polarized, politically, racially, ethnically, that we have been in 50 years. And I believe now is the
moment for Up With People. (upbeat rap music) – [Male Narrator] Welcome
to Up With People Day a the Pima Community
College downtown campus. It’s hard to estimate
the size of the crowd because people keep
getting out of their seats and running on stage. Before long, more people are
on stage than in the audience. That seems to have no impact
on the group’s enthusiasm. (chorus singing) – What’s up everybody? Happy Up With People Day. – [Male Narrator] So
what is up with People? Even after 50 years, that
question can be hard to answer. – One, two, three, four. – Well it started in the
great city of Tucson, in the turbulent 60’s. – [Male Narrator] This is Blanton Belk. He founded Up With People and claims the group prevented World War III. – [Radio Announcer] It
is an expression of the positive voice of youth
from around the world. – [Male Narrator] Belk
was part of a movement called Moral Re-Armament,
which hosted sing-outs in the mid-60’s under the message of love, honesty, purity and unselfishness. – No rules, but bring your guitars. We’re gonna have a hootenannie. – [Radio Announcer]
They feel a sing-out is the best way to express themselves. – [Male Narrator] They
became a square alternative to hippie youth culture. In 1968, Belk split from MRA
and started Up With People. The group’s first and perhaps
biggest fans were politicians. – 95 Congressmen and Senators came to the first show in the
Hilton Hotel with 5000. Standing ovation was led
by Senator Goldwater, your Senator from Arizona, and Fulbright, a Democrat from Arkansas. And if we can bring people together, we’re gonna stay on the road, and we decided we wanna do it. We said we’ll do it. That was the beginning. – [Male Narrator] The rotating cast from diverse backgrounds, would
travel for a year at a time doing community service and
concerts wherever they went. To date they claim to have
had 24,000 performances in 72 countries. And along the way have
done over 3-million hours of community service. – [Documentary Commentator]
In December of 1985, a 127 member cast of Up With People visited five Chinese
cities, with a musical show and a determination to open doors. – [Male Narrator] Up With
People was the second western group to play in China after
George Michael and Wham. ♫ We live close together ♫ In worlds apart – [Male Narrator] The musical
performances have been described as inoffensive as puppy dogs, eating ice-cream and apple-pie. But some question the
group’s underlying motives. A documentary called “Smile Till It Hurts: The
Up With People Story”, paints the group as
naive and quasi-cultish. – [Documentary Commentator]
It also a season for unofficial diplomacy and
the warmth of friendship. – [Male Narrator] The film
criticized its ties to large multinational corporations, which might have gained from the
group’s diplomatic efforts. – [Interviewer] Did you like it? – That’s an understatement. – [Male Narrator] Some Tucson residents and former cast members,
remember it differently. – I joined up with People
as a student in 1986. So July of 1986 was my first trip west of the Mississippi River. – Mr. Belk and my dad were good friends. I grew up with the family
and I thought, okay. And I wanted to be a
fundraiser, which I am now. – [Male Narrator] Brian Cantor
and Julia Waterfall-Cantor met while working with Up With People and have been together ever since. They say the experience was life-changing. – To say it’s special
is putting it mildly. – I would consider Up
With People the single greatest leadership training
program in the world. And then there’s this
thing, yeah, oh yeah. I met my husband, so,
it was life-changing. – Yep. (50’s Doo-wop music) – [Concert Announcer] Music has always been a reflection of the times. – [Male Narrator] At the
height of its popularity, Up With People had multiple casts, with hundreds of member touring the world at the same time. Their enthusiastic performances inspired today’s Super
Bowl halftime shows. Before Up With People, marching
bands were the standard. – Ladies and gentlemen, Up With People. (cheers and applause) – [Male Narrator] During the
1982 Super Bowl in Detroit, Up With People gave a
halftime tribute to Motown. (upbeat music) The performance was panned by critics and Sports Illustrated
rates it as one of the ten worst halftime performances in history. ♫ Up, up with people ♫ They’re the best thing don’t you know – [Male Narrator] The
era of post-modernism, marked by cynicism and irony, clashed with Up With People’s earnest offerings: corporate funding and talent. (disco music intro) They played one last
Super Bowl halftime show in New Orleans in 1986. In 1993, the group moved
it’s offices from Tucson to a suburb of Denver. And in 2000 it suspended operations. ♫ Pounding like a heartbeat ♫ The beat of the future – This is really special. You’ll find a lot of people
know Up With People, here. – [Male Narrator] In 2005,
Up With People relaunched in a smaller, more manageable form. Cast members travel for twenty weeks or one semester at a time. Today, they’ve arrived in Tucson, the third city on their tour. The incredibly diverse cast will do two days of community service at local organizations and play two shows at the Fox Theater. (crowd chatter) – How you doing? Max. – [Male Narrator] While
in town, members stay with host families, who
arrived with bizarre signs, clues and identifiers,
to find their guests. – Hi Jennifer, I’m Chris. – Hi. – [Male Narrator] To
date, the organization claims that over 800,000
families across the world have hosted cast members. They say this builds
meaningful relationships. It also saves money. (upbeat music) Two days later their back
at Pima Community College for Up With People Day. There are performances,
outreach and a culture fair. – So Up With People came to
my city in Tijuana, Mexico. It was the first time I
saw an Up With People show. So since then I fell in love with it. And after graduating high school, I remembered that group
that came to my school and I was like, I wanna be part of that. – One of our most
popular, is a conga-line. We have even done it at the Olympics. – [Male Narrator] The cast
seems to be having a good time. And despite different
levels of experience, are trying hard during their performances. You could even catch them going over their routines in their down time. Not so many people have experiences of like performing, or singing, dancing. But we are trying. As much as we can. I’m in fourth of university
right now, in Japan. And I’m taking a year off to come here. – [Male Narrator] This
new model for the group is much more reliant on
tuition fees from cast members. Currently it costs a little over $17,000 a semester, or $27,000 a year. That doesn’t include the
cost to travel home from Europe after the group
performs its last show. – Well it does cost and
it’s very similar to tuition to go to college. This is, most of our students are taking a gap year, or a semester out from their studies. – My name’s Eddie. I’m going to college here at Pima. I’m passionate about
business and my favorite movie would probably be Dumb and Dumber. – Hi everybody, my name’s Teriq. I’m from the very small island of Bermuda. I’m nineteen years old. Obviously I’m a part of Up With People. – [Male Narrator] It’s hard
to gauge the effectiveness of these outreach
exercises, but it is cool to meet someone from Bermuda or the 19 other countries
cast members hail from. (laughter) – Peace is not just an idea. It’s people becoming friends. That sounds damn trite, but it’s not. The true security in any country is the friendship of your neighbor. And as far as walls go, we have a basic belief that those that believe in freedom and democracy and liberty build bridges. – Whether it’s Tucson or the United States or a global community, we have to find a way to work together. And I think that message
is more relevant today than it’s been since Up With People began. ♫ We share the sky ♫ We share the sun ♫ We share the world ♫ We’re living on – [Male Announcer]
Looking back through time it’s easy to see Up With People as naive. And maybe it was. But not any more or less than anyone else who tried to make the world a better place through song and dance. ♫ Ridin’ on a skateboard ♫ Strollin’ in the park, yeah – Last week, we introduced you to professional
astrophotographer, Adam Block. Well, like Adam, amateur Michael Weizner’s gaze and camera have been focused on the night sky throughout his life. He also enjoys sharing his passion and photographic know-how with others. (traffic hums) (birds chirp) (soft guitar music) – [Michael] There’s a
connection to the night sky that the city-dwellers
don’t really appreciate. And it’s hard to describe. Back when I was like six
years old, early 1950’s, my older brother Paul took
me out in the back yard and showed me the night sky. That’s where I fell in
love with astronomy. (soft guitar music) (soft techno music) – I’m Mike Weizner. I live in Oracle, Arizona. I’m an amateur astronomer and have been for many, many decades. And I certainly enjoy the opportunities to participate in the
things in the night sky. This is my man cave. A lot of astronomy books are in here. You’ll see lots of various pictures and other space-related
paraphernalia in here, as well as some of my flying stuff from when I was flying in the Air Force. While a teenager, back in souther Indiana, my mother gave me a telescope
for Christmas in ’61. And pretty quickly I decided I wanted to take pictures through this telescope. So I used her little
roll-film camera cameras, and mounted it up on the telescope, and started taking pictures of the moon, and what I could of
some planets and things, with that simple little telescope. So it’s been my passion for a long, long, long, long time. From a dark-sky location, like Oracle, you can actually see quite a bit of detail just by looking up with your eye. This photograph is one of
the ones I liked to do. Here’s my telescope, obviously, but the telescope is actually
looking at the moon. And the moon’s image is
being projected out of its eyepiece onto the
dome of the observatory. I have fun taking those kinds of pictures. I document things that
I see in the telescope for several reasons. Primary is because I wanna
share that with people and let them see kinds
of the types of things they could see if they were
to look through a telescope. Theirs or mine. But I also wanna share the fact that they can also do those kinds of pictures. So the fact that I’m doing it with very basic equipment should let them know that they can do the same thing. What star in the sky is
brighter than Sirius? – [Woman] Cause there aren’t any. – [Man] Not visually. – [Michael] But I teach this course, Beginner to Digital
Astrophotography out at the park. And I show people how they can use the equipment that they have, to take pictures of the night sky, whether it’s with their digital camera or with their smart phones. – Oh yeah. Now I see it. Oh my gosh! Oh my gosh! It’s so exciting! (crosstalk) – I didn’t realize how many things that were up in the sky until I got down here. Cause up in Oregon, unless we’re over in the desert in eastern Oregon, you can’t really see things. But here, you can see the Milky Way. I used to see that when I was a kid. I haven’t seen it for decades. – By the early 2000’s I’d
made the switch totally over to using digital
cameras of various models. But I’m also using an iPhone for a lot of my astrophotography. So if you have a smart phone, you can do some of these
same kinds of pictures. You can actually mount this on a tripod by taking this piece off. And so this little piece, up, would mount on a tripod kinda like that. The camera of the iPhone sees what your eye would see if you were looking through the telescope with just your eye. So you’re taking a picture
of what you can see. The objects in the night sky
are beautiful to look at. And being able to capture pictures and show those to your friends, and say, hey I took this
picture, it’s kinda neat. So I want people in the audience and people out in the community to be able to have that same
kind of joy that I’ve got. (soft guitar music) If it’s clear, I’m usually
in the observatory. Day and night. I do stuff with the sun in
the daytime occasionally. I may be out for twenty minutes, or eight hours, depending
upon the weather. And tonight we have some clouds, so I’m not gonna be
out here for very long. We have a nice little crescent
phase of Venus tonight. Getting this word out about our dark skies in this area and in other
places around the world, it’s important because
people need to step back from their daily lives and go out and experience this night-sky culture that’s been part of the human existence for thousands and thousands
and thousands of years. – Nowadays, we hear phrases
like “local food movement” and “farm to table”, but
what does that all mean? One local entrepreneur has taken matters into his own hands connecting
farmers and growers with Tucson chefs who are
seeking quality produce. (slow music) – I grew up in dairy land,
we grow soybeans and cows. I’m not a farmer, a historically really poor farmer when I lived on my grandparents farm. But yeah, it’s incredibly difficult. There’s the USDA study that shows that since 1985, farmers in Arizona have spent more money farming
than they’ve taken in. So more expense than income since 1985. That’s crazy. Almost at capacity. There’s no business model that works in that system at all. But we still want locally grown produce. My name is Eric Stanford and I own and operate Pivot Produce. I’m weighing out five pounds of carrots for the Cup Cafe, and they’re super sweet and delicious. Pivot Produce is a distribution network operating under the food-hub model. I’m purchasing produce and fruits from small farmers in southern Arizona and I’m distributing their produce to some of the best restaurants
in downtown Tucson. Hey Morgan. – Lettuces, carrots,
radishes, spring peas, squashes, pumpkins,
gourds, collard greens, mushrooms, the list is ever growing. My name is Anthony Coluci, and I’m the Executive Chef for Hotel
Congress, the Cup Cafe. Local produce is extremely important food that is easily sourced
cause it’s transparent. And I understand exactly what goes into it so I can get the most out of it. Honestly it’s a lot of fun, because he sends me messages, he
says, hey what do you want? I said, bring everything,
bring it all and I’ll take it. He’s bridged the gap from
farm to table, for sure. – The fava beans? Yeah, they’re from Dreamflower Gardens. Yeah, you got it. Thank you for purchasing them. Middle-man, liaison, broker, they’re all kinda terms that have been thrown around to define what I’m doing. I think middle-man suits pretty well. (upbeat music) – [Woman] It’s so beautiful. – Yeah. – I had this for a salad for a wedding. – Oh nice! – Yeah, so. – Yeah, you got all the kale this week. – I’m so happy yes. – And we’re good, cool. – Thank you. – Thanks Erica, yep. (upbeat music) I’ve been a chef in Tucson and all over the country
for the last 15 years. And I saw a pretty blatant disconnect between the food that I was eating at home and the stuff I brought in
from the farmer’s market; fresh seasonal produce,
and the produce that I was working with in
most of the restaurants, most of the kitchens
that I was working in. The flavor, what that is, when you have something in the ground
that’s nutrient rich, the soil has been cultivated to the point where it’s putting as much nutrients as it can into that tomato. It tastes like a tomato and it smells like a tomato and it feels like a tomato. But it’s the best damn
tomato you’ve ever had. It’s cause a farmer grew it and had compassion while they were growing it and thought about the best way
to propagate that vegetable. And they not only in that season, but the three seasons
before were planning how that soil is alive and
how they’ve kept it alive. I think what you’re
tasting is their hard work and their compassion. And in a industrialized
food growing system you’re not tasting that. Farmer’s markets are great, but it’s not practical for a farmer to go to five farmer’s markets a week to sustain their business. We’re headed to the
southwest side of Tucson to the Breckenfeld’s Family Farm. They’ve been farming this plot of land for something like 32 years. And when you break it down to the raw core of what we’re trying to do. I’m trying to make sure that they’re spending more time growing vegetables rather than worrying where they’re gonna go or how they’re gonna sell them, who they’re gonna market to, do they have to find a new restaurant or market or whatever. Let me take care of that basically. And it’s what we’ve been doing. Going out to the farms,
physically being there, and going through and tasting
crops out of the field. And getting the like
subtle, subtle differences. I mean that’s the best part of my week. Let’s weigh it out, cause they
might wanna use some of this. – Aah. (laughs) – [Eric] Right? It’s so sweet and buttery. How many pounds did you harvest last year? – He’s a fellow Wisconsin person, so. (laughs) We kinda hit it off right on. This is all the flower,
that’s what you’re eating. – My name is Don Breckenfeld. Actually I’m a retired Soil
Scientist with the USDA. After I retired, I just got
crazy with the gardening and took my own advice now
I’m growing my own vegetables. This the ancestral
floodplain of the Santa Cruz, so these soils here are very rich. And they’ve been in production that dates back to 6000 years ago. Very delicious, great for salsa. – Mm-hmm. Mm, I’m lovin’ it. That’s great. – Right now, we got a garlic crop that’s bout ready to come out and we grow 14 different varieties of garlic. Well we grow five different types of kale, three different types of spinach, beets. We’re also getting ready
to put in tomatoes. We grow 22 different
varieties of tomatoes. And the peppers will be
going in here shortly. Yeah, it’s hard to pick
cause I love all of it. It’s just part of me. I just love growing things and I like growing food for people. And we know it’s gonna go to a good use. – What a lot of farmers have said about me is that I’m bilingual
in that I speak chef, I used to know that culture, I
know the back of the kitchen, I know the mindset that that is of a chef. And then I’ve come to
learn what it takes to be a small grower and learned
the language of that. Hit it with a little bit
of apple cider vinegar. That steams it. – That sounds good. You can talk to Eric and he understands what you’re talking about, you know, the different flavors. You think of garlic as just garlic and I can tell him this
one’s nice and hot, this one has a floral taste. You can see the wheels turning in his head how he can cook with this. – Oh look the grapevines
are popping up already too. Alright, I’ll be back for grape leaves. – I’m gonna get a little
philosophical here, but this is almost like my church. I feel so much togetherness with nature and everything around
me by working out here. I almost feel like the
plants can talk to you after awhile and you
just start reading what they’re saying and you
just take care of them. – Carrots taste more like carrots. Peaches taste more like peaches. The strawberries taste
more like strawberries. The flavors are really big. And it’s very unexpected
and I think it’s a, just a great side effect
of getting local food. I’d say it’s hard for a
farmer to drive to me, it’s hard for me to drive to a farm. So he’s doing the work for me, and every Wednesday I get a little inventory slip from him,
this is what I have, and I say great, bring it on. – Mitch I just gotta go to the front desk I got a check waiting up there for me. Oh there I am, I see it, I see it. Alright! Thank you, see you next week. Alright Tony, see you soon. – Appreciate it. – Thank you. So I’m not saying that local produce is going to take over the market and we’re all gonna be eating what’s grown in Tucson, because we live in a desert. I don’t think we could produce enough for one-million people to sustain here. But, I think it’s an important
thing to work towards. How else can we help? How can we make it more viable to be a farmer in southern Arizona? That’s what’s important. Is making it more viable. – [Male Announcer] In the
midst of the gas crisis in 1974, a federal law
was passed that prohibited speed limits higher
than 55 miles per hour. That lasted until 1987,
when states pushed to Raise The Limit, from the vault. – [Newswoman] It was just
about nine this morning, when officials of the State
Department of Transportation made the change, the 55 became 65. Signs on nearly 1200 miles
of interstate highway will be changed. Governor Mecham signed the bill into law at eight this morning. It was Mecham who led the charge to change the speed limit. – I didn’t do it all by myself. But I’m the one that led the deal to do it at the MGA when I was
told it couldn’t pass. The difference between
55 and 65 on the things that the studies that’s
been made, really don’t relate to safety when
you’ve got the right roads. – [Newswoman] Eugene
Ireland is an engineer with the Arizona Department
of Transportation. – It reflects more nearly the position of the people on
how they want to drive. – While the speed limit signs may read 65 what they may actually mean is 70. – My understanding is that the patrol will start citing over 70. – [Newswoman] As for those
who drive on the highways the reviews are somewhat mixed. The higher speed limits
may be good for business but somewhat less safe. – I think it’s great. I don’t think trucks will abuse
it too much, the majority. I just, it’ll help us to get to our destinations quicker and
we’ll make more money. – I’m worried about the
older people on the road. They’re not gonna be used to it. – It is a mix between
low-speed and high-speed, it definitely is a, requires
more careful driving. (big rig horn blares) – [Reporter] Drivers are honking,
they’re obviously pleased. – [DOT Worker] Sounds like it, yeah. (upbeat music) – Thank you for joining us
here on Arizona Illustrated. I’m Tom McNamara, see you next week.

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